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Music of the Prophets.

Research output: Book/Report/ProceedingsBook

Published

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Music of the Prophets. / Wandor, M.

ARC Publications, 2007. 60 p.

Research output: Book/Report/ProceedingsBook

Harvard

Wandor, M 2007, Music of the Prophets. ARC Publications.

APA

Wandor, M. (2007). Music of the Prophets. ARC Publications.

Vancouver

Wandor M. Music of the Prophets. ARC Publications, 2007. 60 p.

Author

Wandor, M. / Music of the Prophets. ARC Publications, 2007. 60 p.

Bibtex

@book{7f3680f46f3f4972b78806860a07d76d,
title = "Music of the Prophets.",
author = "M. Wandor",
note = "This narrative represents a radical departure from the personal or confessional lyric which is still the predominant form within contemporary poetry. Supported by a grant from the European Association for Jewish Culture, the poem was written to commemorate the unofficial resettlement of the Jews in mid-seventeenth century England. Historical research, returning to primary sources, revealed a temporary alliance between Oliver Cromwell and the Dutch rabbi, Menasseh ben Israel. The poem works through this relationship to explore issues of exile, clandestine cultural identity, and collusive economic convenience, all from a secular and contemporary viewpoint. The poem also represents a very self-conscious tribute to the passionate ratiocination of 17th-century English poetry. In performance, this poem deployed music by John Hingeston in a cultural crossover of poetry and music. It has been performed in a number of venues and music festivals. RAE_import_type : Authored book RAE_uoa_type : English Language and Literature",
year = "2007",
language = "English",
isbn = "1904614639",
publisher = "ARC Publications",

}

RIS

TY - BOOK

T1 - Music of the Prophets.

AU - Wandor, M.

N1 - This narrative represents a radical departure from the personal or confessional lyric which is still the predominant form within contemporary poetry. Supported by a grant from the European Association for Jewish Culture, the poem was written to commemorate the unofficial resettlement of the Jews in mid-seventeenth century England. Historical research, returning to primary sources, revealed a temporary alliance between Oliver Cromwell and the Dutch rabbi, Menasseh ben Israel. The poem works through this relationship to explore issues of exile, clandestine cultural identity, and collusive economic convenience, all from a secular and contemporary viewpoint. The poem also represents a very self-conscious tribute to the passionate ratiocination of 17th-century English poetry. In performance, this poem deployed music by John Hingeston in a cultural crossover of poetry and music. It has been performed in a number of venues and music festivals. RAE_import_type : Authored book RAE_uoa_type : English Language and Literature

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

M3 - Book

SN - 1904614639

BT - Music of the Prophets.

PB - ARC Publications

ER -