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    Rights statement: The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, First Language, 36 (5), 2016, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2016 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the First Language page: http://fla.sagepub.com/ on SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/

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Mutual exclusivity develops as a consequence of abstract rather than particular vocabulary knowledge

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Mutual exclusivity develops as a consequence of abstract rather than particular vocabulary knowledge. / Kalashnikova, Marina; Mattock, Karen; Monaghan, Padraic.

In: First Language, Vol. 36, No. 5, 15.11.2016, p. 451-464.

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@article{00bdb1cb2bb84242b63f382089a56fc4,
title = "Mutual exclusivity develops as a consequence of abstract rather than particular vocabulary knowledge",
abstract = "Mutual exclusivity (ME) refers to the assumption that there are one-to-one relations between linguistic forms and their meanings. It is used as a word-learning strategy whereby children tend to map novel labels to unfamiliar rather than familiar referents. Previous research has indicated a relation between ME and vocabulary development, which could either be due to children's developing knowledge of the labels for familiar objects, or to enhanced general word-learning skills. In this study, ME was related to receptive vocabulary for 17- to 19-month-old children in a novel paradigm where children's familiarity with the objects and labels was controlled. It was found that infants with larger receptive vocabularies employed ME to a greater extent than infants with a smaller vocabulary size. The results indicate that ME use is more reliable in infants with larger receptive vocabulary size, and, critically, that ME gradually consolidates as an abstract word-learning strategy as infants' linguistic experience increases.",
keywords = "Fast mapping, lexical acquisition, mutual exclusivity, referent selection, vocabulary, word learning, SIMILAR-SOUNDING WORDS, REFERENT SELECTION, BILINGUAL INFANTS, PHONETIC DETAIL, DISAMBIGUATION, OBJECT, CHILDREN, LANGUAGE, RECOGNITION, CONSTRAINTS",
author = "Marina Kalashnikova and Karen Mattock and Padraic Monaghan",
note = "The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, First Language, 36 (5), 2016, {\textcopyright} SAGE Publications Ltd, 2016 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the First Language page: http://fla.sagepub.com/ on SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/ ",
year = "2016",
month = nov
day = "15",
doi = "10.1177/0142723716648850",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
pages = "451--464",
journal = "First Language",
issn = "0142-7237",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mutual exclusivity develops as a consequence of abstract rather than particular vocabulary knowledge

AU - Kalashnikova, Marina

AU - Mattock, Karen

AU - Monaghan, Padraic

N1 - The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, First Language, 36 (5), 2016, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2016 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the First Language page: http://fla.sagepub.com/ on SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/

PY - 2016/11/15

Y1 - 2016/11/15

N2 - Mutual exclusivity (ME) refers to the assumption that there are one-to-one relations between linguistic forms and their meanings. It is used as a word-learning strategy whereby children tend to map novel labels to unfamiliar rather than familiar referents. Previous research has indicated a relation between ME and vocabulary development, which could either be due to children's developing knowledge of the labels for familiar objects, or to enhanced general word-learning skills. In this study, ME was related to receptive vocabulary for 17- to 19-month-old children in a novel paradigm where children's familiarity with the objects and labels was controlled. It was found that infants with larger receptive vocabularies employed ME to a greater extent than infants with a smaller vocabulary size. The results indicate that ME use is more reliable in infants with larger receptive vocabulary size, and, critically, that ME gradually consolidates as an abstract word-learning strategy as infants' linguistic experience increases.

AB - Mutual exclusivity (ME) refers to the assumption that there are one-to-one relations between linguistic forms and their meanings. It is used as a word-learning strategy whereby children tend to map novel labels to unfamiliar rather than familiar referents. Previous research has indicated a relation between ME and vocabulary development, which could either be due to children's developing knowledge of the labels for familiar objects, or to enhanced general word-learning skills. In this study, ME was related to receptive vocabulary for 17- to 19-month-old children in a novel paradigm where children's familiarity with the objects and labels was controlled. It was found that infants with larger receptive vocabularies employed ME to a greater extent than infants with a smaller vocabulary size. The results indicate that ME use is more reliable in infants with larger receptive vocabulary size, and, critically, that ME gradually consolidates as an abstract word-learning strategy as infants' linguistic experience increases.

KW - Fast mapping

KW - lexical acquisition

KW - mutual exclusivity

KW - referent selection

KW - vocabulary

KW - word learning

KW - SIMILAR-SOUNDING WORDS

KW - REFERENT SELECTION

KW - BILINGUAL INFANTS

KW - PHONETIC DETAIL

KW - DISAMBIGUATION

KW - OBJECT

KW - CHILDREN

KW - LANGUAGE

KW - RECOGNITION

KW - CONSTRAINTS

U2 - 10.1177/0142723716648850

DO - 10.1177/0142723716648850

M3 - Journal article

VL - 36

SP - 451

EP - 464

JO - First Language

JF - First Language

SN - 0142-7237

IS - 5

ER -