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Nanoelectronic primary thermometry below 4 mK

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Nanoelectronic primary thermometry below 4 mK. / Bradley, David Ian; George, Richard Edwin; Gunnarsson, David; Haley, Richard Peter; Heikkinen, Hannele; Pashkin, Yuri; Penttilä, J.; Prance, Jonathan Robert; Prunnila, Mika; Roschier, Leif; Sarsby, Matt.

In: Nature Communications, Vol. 7, 10455, 27.01.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Bradley, DI, George, RE, Gunnarsson, D, Haley, RP, Heikkinen, H, Pashkin, Y, Penttilä, J, Prance, JR, Prunnila, M, Roschier, L & Sarsby, M 2016, 'Nanoelectronic primary thermometry below 4 mK', Nature Communications, vol. 7, 10455. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms10455

APA

Bradley, D. I., George, R. E., Gunnarsson, D., Haley, R. P., Heikkinen, H., Pashkin, Y., Penttilä, J., Prance, J. R., Prunnila, M., Roschier, L., & Sarsby, M. (2016). Nanoelectronic primary thermometry below 4 mK. Nature Communications, 7, [10455]. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms10455

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Author

Bradley, David Ian ; George, Richard Edwin ; Gunnarsson, David ; Haley, Richard Peter ; Heikkinen, Hannele ; Pashkin, Yuri ; Penttilä, J. ; Prance, Jonathan Robert ; Prunnila, Mika ; Roschier, Leif ; Sarsby, Matt. / Nanoelectronic primary thermometry below 4 mK. In: Nature Communications. 2016 ; Vol. 7.

Bibtex

@article{62ad23b162b3403abfe332939db64e5b,
title = "Nanoelectronic primary thermometry below 4 mK",
abstract = "Cooling nanoelectronic structures to millikelvin temperatures presents extreme challenges in maintaining thermal contact between the electrons in the device and an external cold bath. It is typically found that when nanoscale devices are cooled to ~10 mK the electrons are significantly overheated. Here we report the cooling of electrons in nanoelectronic Coulomb blockade thermometers below 4 mK. The low operating temperature is attributed to an optimized design that incorporates cooling fins with a high electron–phonon coupling and on-chip electronic filters, combined with low-noise electronic measurements. By immersing a Coulomb blockade thermometer in the 3He/4He refrigerant of a dilution refrigerator, we measure a lowest electron temperature of 3.7 mK and a trend to a saturated electron temperature approaching 3 mK. This work demonstrates how nanoelectronic samples can be cooled further into the low-millikelvin range.",
author = "Bradley, {David Ian} and George, {Richard Edwin} and David Gunnarsson and Haley, {Richard Peter} and Hannele Heikkinen and Yuri Pashkin and J. Penttil{\"a} and Prance, {Jonathan Robert} and Mika Prunnila and Leif Roschier and Matt Sarsby",
year = "2016",
month = jan,
day = "27",
doi = "10.1038/ncomms10455",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
journal = "Nature Communications",
issn = "2041-1723",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Nanoelectronic primary thermometry below 4 mK

AU - Bradley, David Ian

AU - George, Richard Edwin

AU - Gunnarsson, David

AU - Haley, Richard Peter

AU - Heikkinen, Hannele

AU - Pashkin, Yuri

AU - Penttilä, J.

AU - Prance, Jonathan Robert

AU - Prunnila, Mika

AU - Roschier, Leif

AU - Sarsby, Matt

PY - 2016/1/27

Y1 - 2016/1/27

N2 - Cooling nanoelectronic structures to millikelvin temperatures presents extreme challenges in maintaining thermal contact between the electrons in the device and an external cold bath. It is typically found that when nanoscale devices are cooled to ~10 mK the electrons are significantly overheated. Here we report the cooling of electrons in nanoelectronic Coulomb blockade thermometers below 4 mK. The low operating temperature is attributed to an optimized design that incorporates cooling fins with a high electron–phonon coupling and on-chip electronic filters, combined with low-noise electronic measurements. By immersing a Coulomb blockade thermometer in the 3He/4He refrigerant of a dilution refrigerator, we measure a lowest electron temperature of 3.7 mK and a trend to a saturated electron temperature approaching 3 mK. This work demonstrates how nanoelectronic samples can be cooled further into the low-millikelvin range.

AB - Cooling nanoelectronic structures to millikelvin temperatures presents extreme challenges in maintaining thermal contact between the electrons in the device and an external cold bath. It is typically found that when nanoscale devices are cooled to ~10 mK the electrons are significantly overheated. Here we report the cooling of electrons in nanoelectronic Coulomb blockade thermometers below 4 mK. The low operating temperature is attributed to an optimized design that incorporates cooling fins with a high electron–phonon coupling and on-chip electronic filters, combined with low-noise electronic measurements. By immersing a Coulomb blockade thermometer in the 3He/4He refrigerant of a dilution refrigerator, we measure a lowest electron temperature of 3.7 mK and a trend to a saturated electron temperature approaching 3 mK. This work demonstrates how nanoelectronic samples can be cooled further into the low-millikelvin range.

U2 - 10.1038/ncomms10455

DO - 10.1038/ncomms10455

M3 - Journal article

VL - 7

JO - Nature Communications

JF - Nature Communications

SN - 2041-1723

M1 - 10455

ER -