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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Brain and Language. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Brain and Language, 122, 3, 2012 DOI: 10.1016/j.bandl.2011.12.007

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Neural correlates of written emotion word processing: a review of recent electrophysiological and hemodynamic neuroimaging studies

Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature review

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>09/2012
<mark>Journal</mark>Brain and Language
Issue number3
Volume122
Number of pages16
Pages (from-to)211-226
Publication statusPublished
Early online date24/01/12
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

A growing body of literature investigating the neural correlates of emotion word processing has emerged in recent years. Written words have been shown to represent a suitable means to study emotion processing and most importantly to address the distinct and interactive contributions of the two dimensions of emotion: valence and arousal. The aim of the present review is to integrate findings from electrophysiological (ERP) and hemodynamic neuroimaging (fMRI) studies in order to provide a better understanding of emotion word processing. It provides an up-to-date review of recent ERP studies since the review by Kissler et al. (2006) as well as the first review of hemodynamic brain imaging studies in the field. A discussion of theoretical and methodological issues is also presented, along with suggestions for future research. 

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Brain and Language. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Brain and Language, 122, 3, 2012 DOI: 10.1016/j.bandl.2011.12.007