Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Opening other windows: a political economy of "...
View graph of relations

Opening other windows: a political economy of "openness" in a global information society

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published

Standard

Opening other windows: a political economy of "openness" in a global information society. / May, Christopher.

In: Review of International Studies, Vol. 34, No. Special Issue, 01.01.2008, p. 69-92.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

May, Christopher. / Opening other windows: a political economy of "openness" in a global information society. In: Review of International Studies. 2008 ; Vol. 34, No. Special Issue. pp. 69-92.

Bibtex

@article{657e2d0cb9de41a7b6517ddf89db2d02,
title = "Opening other windows: a political economy of {"}openness{"} in a global information society",
abstract = "Although analysis in IR and IPE has increasingly started to focus on non-state actors and the information society, the role of the legal architecture of the Internet has been relatively under-analysed in terms of the structural power around communication interfaces. In this paper I suggest the work of Lewis Mumford offers a useful lens for thinking about the political economy of technological change in an information society. I set out the role of intellectual property rights as the legal form of the global information society, and suggest a major challenge to this legal form is the idea of 'openness', specifically in the realm of open-source and/or free software. I examine this issue in the realm of (so-called) informational development, where major proprietary players (predominantly Microsoft) have been confronted by an increasingly vibrant open-source alternative. The open source and free software movement can be analysed as an emerging example of a globalisd 'double movement', seeking to re-embed the tools of informational development in a societal realm of information, establishing in Mumford’s terms a ‘democratic technics’ as a reaction to the programme of information and knowledge commodification spurred by the TRIPs agreement.",
keywords = "open access, Information Society",
author = "Christopher May",
year = "2008",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1017/S0260210508007808",
language = "English",
volume = "34",
pages = "69--92",
journal = "Review of International Studies",
issn = "0260-2105",
publisher = "CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS",
number = "Special Issue",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Opening other windows: a political economy of "openness" in a global information society

AU - May, Christopher

PY - 2008/1/1

Y1 - 2008/1/1

N2 - Although analysis in IR and IPE has increasingly started to focus on non-state actors and the information society, the role of the legal architecture of the Internet has been relatively under-analysed in terms of the structural power around communication interfaces. In this paper I suggest the work of Lewis Mumford offers a useful lens for thinking about the political economy of technological change in an information society. I set out the role of intellectual property rights as the legal form of the global information society, and suggest a major challenge to this legal form is the idea of 'openness', specifically in the realm of open-source and/or free software. I examine this issue in the realm of (so-called) informational development, where major proprietary players (predominantly Microsoft) have been confronted by an increasingly vibrant open-source alternative. The open source and free software movement can be analysed as an emerging example of a globalisd 'double movement', seeking to re-embed the tools of informational development in a societal realm of information, establishing in Mumford’s terms a ‘democratic technics’ as a reaction to the programme of information and knowledge commodification spurred by the TRIPs agreement.

AB - Although analysis in IR and IPE has increasingly started to focus on non-state actors and the information society, the role of the legal architecture of the Internet has been relatively under-analysed in terms of the structural power around communication interfaces. In this paper I suggest the work of Lewis Mumford offers a useful lens for thinking about the political economy of technological change in an information society. I set out the role of intellectual property rights as the legal form of the global information society, and suggest a major challenge to this legal form is the idea of 'openness', specifically in the realm of open-source and/or free software. I examine this issue in the realm of (so-called) informational development, where major proprietary players (predominantly Microsoft) have been confronted by an increasingly vibrant open-source alternative. The open source and free software movement can be analysed as an emerging example of a globalisd 'double movement', seeking to re-embed the tools of informational development in a societal realm of information, establishing in Mumford’s terms a ‘democratic technics’ as a reaction to the programme of information and knowledge commodification spurred by the TRIPs agreement.

KW - open access

KW - Information Society

U2 - 10.1017/S0260210508007808

DO - 10.1017/S0260210508007808

M3 - Journal article

VL - 34

SP - 69

EP - 92

JO - Review of International Studies

JF - Review of International Studies

SN - 0260-2105

IS - Special Issue

ER -