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  • Beesley et al. (in press)

    Rights statement: ©American Psychological Association, 2018. This paper is not the copy of record and may not exactly replicate the authoritative document published in the APA journal. Please do not copy or cite without author's permission. The final article is available, upon publication, at: http://psycnet.apa.org/record/2018-13692-001

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Overt attention in contextual cuing of visual search is driven by the attentional set, but not by the predictiveness of distractors

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  • Tom Beesley
  • Gunadi Hanafi
  • Miguel A. Vadillo
  • D.R. Shanks
  • Evan J. Livesey
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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/05/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition
Issue number5
Volume44
Number of pages15
Pages (from-to)707-721
Publication StatusPublished
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Two experiments examined biases in selective attention during contextual cuing of visual search. When participants were instructed to search for a target of a particular color, overt attention (as measured by the location of fixations) was biased strongly toward distractors presented in that same color. However, when participants searched for targets that could be presented in 1 of 2 possible colors, overt attention was not biased between the different distractors, regardless of whether these distractors predicted the location of the target (repeating) or did not (randomly arranged). These data suggest that selective attention in visual search is guided only by the demands of the target detection task (the attentional set) and not by the predictive validity of the distractor elements.

Bibliographic note

©American Psychological Association, 2018. This paper is not the copy of record and may not exactly replicate the authoritative document published in the APA journal. Please do not copy or cite without author's permission. The final article is available, upon publication, at: http://psycnet.apa.org/record/2018-13692-001