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Oxygen minimum zones in the early Cambrian ocean

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Oxygen minimum zones in the early Cambrian ocean. / Guilbaud, Romain; Slater, Ben J.; Poulton, Simon W.; Harvey, Thomas H.P.; Brocks, Jochen; Nettesheim, B. J.; Butterfield, Nicholas J.

In: Geochemical Perspectives Letters, Vol. 6, 01.03.2018, p. 33-38.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Guilbaud, R, Slater, BJ, Poulton, SW, Harvey, THP, Brocks, J, Nettesheim, BJ & Butterfield, NJ 2018, 'Oxygen minimum zones in the early Cambrian ocean' Geochemical Perspectives Letters, vol 6, pp. 33-38. DOI: 10.7185/geochemlet.1806

APA

Guilbaud, R., Slater, B. J., Poulton, S. W., Harvey, T. H. P., Brocks, J., Nettesheim, B. J., & Butterfield, N. J. (2018). Oxygen minimum zones in the early Cambrian ocean. Geochemical Perspectives Letters, 6, 33-38. DOI: 10.7185/geochemlet.1806

Vancouver

Guilbaud R, Slater BJ, Poulton SW, Harvey THP, Brocks J, Nettesheim BJ et al. Oxygen minimum zones in the early Cambrian ocean. Geochemical Perspectives Letters. 2018 Mar 1;6:33-38. Available from, DOI: 10.7185/geochemlet.1806

Author

Guilbaud, Romain; Slater, Ben J.; Poulton, Simon W.; Harvey, Thomas H.P.; Brocks, Jochen; Nettesheim, B. J.; Butterfield, Nicholas J. / Oxygen minimum zones in the early Cambrian ocean.

In: Geochemical Perspectives Letters, Vol. 6, 01.03.2018, p. 33-38.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Bibtex

@article{67f2b30536b44007aa6aa0f9955fe9e3,
title = "Oxygen minimum zones in the early Cambrian ocean",
abstract = "The relationship between the evolution of early animal communities and oceanic oxygen levels remains unclear. In particular, uncertainty persists in reconstructions of redox conditions during the pivotal early Cambrian (541-510 million years ago, Ma), where conflicting datasets from deeper marine settings suggest either ocean anoxia or fully oxygenated conditions. By coupling geochemical palaeoredox proxies with a record of organic-walled fossils from exceptionally well-defined successions of the early Cambrian Baltic Basin, we provide evidence for the early establishment of modern-type oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). Both inner- and outer-shelf environments were pervasively oxygenated, whereas mid-depth settings were characterised by spatially oscillating anoxia. As such, conflicting redox signatures recovered from individual sites most likely derive from sampling bias, whereby anoxic conditions represent mid-shelf environments with higher productivity. This picture of a spatially restricted anoxic wedge contrasts with prevailing models of globally stratified oceans, offering a more nuanced and realistic account of the Proterozoic-Phanerozoic ocean transition.",
keywords = "oxygen minimum zone, early Cambrian, redox, animals, oxygen",
author = "Romain Guilbaud and Slater, {Ben J.} and Poulton, {Simon W.} and Harvey, {Thomas H.P.} and Jochen Brocks and Nettesheim, {B. J.} and Butterfield, {Nicholas J.}",
year = "2018",
month = "3",
doi = "10.7185/geochemlet.1806",
volume = "6",
pages = "33--38",
journal = "Geochemical Perspectives Letters",
issn = "2410-339X",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Oxygen minimum zones in the early Cambrian ocean

AU - Guilbaud,Romain

AU - Slater,Ben J.

AU - Poulton,Simon W.

AU - Harvey,Thomas H.P.

AU - Brocks,Jochen

AU - Nettesheim,B. J.

AU - Butterfield,Nicholas J.

PY - 2018/3/1

Y1 - 2018/3/1

N2 - The relationship between the evolution of early animal communities and oceanic oxygen levels remains unclear. In particular, uncertainty persists in reconstructions of redox conditions during the pivotal early Cambrian (541-510 million years ago, Ma), where conflicting datasets from deeper marine settings suggest either ocean anoxia or fully oxygenated conditions. By coupling geochemical palaeoredox proxies with a record of organic-walled fossils from exceptionally well-defined successions of the early Cambrian Baltic Basin, we provide evidence for the early establishment of modern-type oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). Both inner- and outer-shelf environments were pervasively oxygenated, whereas mid-depth settings were characterised by spatially oscillating anoxia. As such, conflicting redox signatures recovered from individual sites most likely derive from sampling bias, whereby anoxic conditions represent mid-shelf environments with higher productivity. This picture of a spatially restricted anoxic wedge contrasts with prevailing models of globally stratified oceans, offering a more nuanced and realistic account of the Proterozoic-Phanerozoic ocean transition.

AB - The relationship between the evolution of early animal communities and oceanic oxygen levels remains unclear. In particular, uncertainty persists in reconstructions of redox conditions during the pivotal early Cambrian (541-510 million years ago, Ma), where conflicting datasets from deeper marine settings suggest either ocean anoxia or fully oxygenated conditions. By coupling geochemical palaeoredox proxies with a record of organic-walled fossils from exceptionally well-defined successions of the early Cambrian Baltic Basin, we provide evidence for the early establishment of modern-type oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). Both inner- and outer-shelf environments were pervasively oxygenated, whereas mid-depth settings were characterised by spatially oscillating anoxia. As such, conflicting redox signatures recovered from individual sites most likely derive from sampling bias, whereby anoxic conditions represent mid-shelf environments with higher productivity. This picture of a spatially restricted anoxic wedge contrasts with prevailing models of globally stratified oceans, offering a more nuanced and realistic account of the Proterozoic-Phanerozoic ocean transition.

KW - oxygen minimum zone

KW - early Cambrian

KW - redox

KW - animals

KW - oxygen

U2 - 10.7185/geochemlet.1806

DO - 10.7185/geochemlet.1806

M3 - Journal article

VL - 6

SP - 33

EP - 38

JO - Geochemical Perspectives Letters

T2 - Geochemical Perspectives Letters

JF - Geochemical Perspectives Letters

SN - 2410-339X

ER -