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    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in Word and Image on 22/06/2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02666286.2016.1146513

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Paratext or imagetext?: interpreting the fictional map

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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Paratext or imagetext? interpreting the fictional map. / Bushell, Sally.

In: Word and Image, Vol. 32, No. 2, 06.2016, p. 181-194.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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Bushell, Sally. / Paratext or imagetext? interpreting the fictional map. In: Word and Image. 2016 ; Vol. 32, No. 2. pp. 181-194.

Bibtex

@article{0af5f0c580534b47a589cb7b54cf4e5d,
title = "Paratext or imagetext?: interpreting the fictional map",
abstract = "This article is concerned with the relationship between a fictional map and a fictional text and the way in which we understand and interpret that relationship. It seeks to explore visual/verbal relations (between map and text) through meaningful elements relating to the juxtaposition of these two forms within the covers of a book. Its primary interest is in determining the nature of the dynamic between map and text, arguing for a more integrated model of interpretation. The first part of the article, therefore, draws upon G{\`e}rard Genette{\textquoteright}s account of the paratext in order to consider to what extent the fictional map functions in a paratextual role. The central section of the article explores the spatial and material relationship between map and text by applying Genette{\textquoteright}s four key paratextual aspects – location, temporality, communication and function – to analysis of the fictional map, with particular attention to two examples from Ransome and Tolkien. The final section reflects on the strengths and limits of this approach and incorporates the alternative offered by W. J. T. Mitchell{\textquoteright}s formulation of the “imagetext”.",
keywords = "paratext, imagetext, map, literary",
author = "Sally Bushell",
note = "This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in Word and Image on 22/06/2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02666286.2016.1146513",
year = "2016",
month = jun
doi = "10.1080/02666286.2016.1146513",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "181--194",
journal = "Word and Image",
issn = "0266-6286",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Paratext or imagetext?

T2 - interpreting the fictional map

AU - Bushell, Sally

N1 - This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in Word and Image on 22/06/2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02666286.2016.1146513

PY - 2016/6

Y1 - 2016/6

N2 - This article is concerned with the relationship between a fictional map and a fictional text and the way in which we understand and interpret that relationship. It seeks to explore visual/verbal relations (between map and text) through meaningful elements relating to the juxtaposition of these two forms within the covers of a book. Its primary interest is in determining the nature of the dynamic between map and text, arguing for a more integrated model of interpretation. The first part of the article, therefore, draws upon Gèrard Genette’s account of the paratext in order to consider to what extent the fictional map functions in a paratextual role. The central section of the article explores the spatial and material relationship between map and text by applying Genette’s four key paratextual aspects – location, temporality, communication and function – to analysis of the fictional map, with particular attention to two examples from Ransome and Tolkien. The final section reflects on the strengths and limits of this approach and incorporates the alternative offered by W. J. T. Mitchell’s formulation of the “imagetext”.

AB - This article is concerned with the relationship between a fictional map and a fictional text and the way in which we understand and interpret that relationship. It seeks to explore visual/verbal relations (between map and text) through meaningful elements relating to the juxtaposition of these two forms within the covers of a book. Its primary interest is in determining the nature of the dynamic between map and text, arguing for a more integrated model of interpretation. The first part of the article, therefore, draws upon Gèrard Genette’s account of the paratext in order to consider to what extent the fictional map functions in a paratextual role. The central section of the article explores the spatial and material relationship between map and text by applying Genette’s four key paratextual aspects – location, temporality, communication and function – to analysis of the fictional map, with particular attention to two examples from Ransome and Tolkien. The final section reflects on the strengths and limits of this approach and incorporates the alternative offered by W. J. T. Mitchell’s formulation of the “imagetext”.

KW - paratext

KW - imagetext

KW - map

KW - literary

U2 - 10.1080/02666286.2016.1146513

DO - 10.1080/02666286.2016.1146513

M3 - Journal article

VL - 32

SP - 181

EP - 194

JO - Word and Image

JF - Word and Image

SN - 0266-6286

IS - 2

ER -