Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Peer facilitation and how it contributes to the...
View graph of relations

Peer facilitation and how it contributes to the development of a more social view of learning

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published

Standard

Peer facilitation and how it contributes to the development of a more social view of learning. / Ashwin, Paul.

In: Research in Post-Compulsory Education, Vol. 8, No. 1, 01.03.2003, p. 5-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Ashwin, Paul. / Peer facilitation and how it contributes to the development of a more social view of learning. In: Research in Post-Compulsory Education. 2003 ; Vol. 8, No. 1. pp. 5-18.

Bibtex

@article{5e7150fe617f48a5abb9078fd3504843,
title = "Peer facilitation and how it contributes to the development of a more social view of learning",
abstract = "Peer learning involves a new role for the students who facilitate the learning of other students. The role of the peer facilitator, which is focused on learning through supporting the learning of other students, would appear to be more social than the traditional role of learner, which is focused on self-learning. This research used repertory grids to investigate whether taking on the more social role of the peer facilitator was related to changes in what students perceived as important in teaching and in learning. Initially, all students saw constructs relating to expectations of the self as more important in learning than those relating to interaction with others. However, in a later repertory grid, the students who acted as peer facilitators saw interaction with others as a more important element of their learning. There was no comparable change in the perceptions of what was important in learning amongst students who were not involved in peer learning or in the perceptions of what was important in teaching amongst all students. These findings are explained with reference to recent developments in the student-learning literature. Their implications are explored both in terms of helping students to develop a greater understanding of their roles as learners and in offering an additional dimension with which to explore students' learning",
author = "Paul Ashwin",
year = "2003",
month = mar
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/13596740300200137",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "5--18",
journal = "Research in Post-Compulsory Education",
issn = "1359-6748",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Peer facilitation and how it contributes to the development of a more social view of learning

AU - Ashwin, Paul

PY - 2003/3/1

Y1 - 2003/3/1

N2 - Peer learning involves a new role for the students who facilitate the learning of other students. The role of the peer facilitator, which is focused on learning through supporting the learning of other students, would appear to be more social than the traditional role of learner, which is focused on self-learning. This research used repertory grids to investigate whether taking on the more social role of the peer facilitator was related to changes in what students perceived as important in teaching and in learning. Initially, all students saw constructs relating to expectations of the self as more important in learning than those relating to interaction with others. However, in a later repertory grid, the students who acted as peer facilitators saw interaction with others as a more important element of their learning. There was no comparable change in the perceptions of what was important in learning amongst students who were not involved in peer learning or in the perceptions of what was important in teaching amongst all students. These findings are explained with reference to recent developments in the student-learning literature. Their implications are explored both in terms of helping students to develop a greater understanding of their roles as learners and in offering an additional dimension with which to explore students' learning

AB - Peer learning involves a new role for the students who facilitate the learning of other students. The role of the peer facilitator, which is focused on learning through supporting the learning of other students, would appear to be more social than the traditional role of learner, which is focused on self-learning. This research used repertory grids to investigate whether taking on the more social role of the peer facilitator was related to changes in what students perceived as important in teaching and in learning. Initially, all students saw constructs relating to expectations of the self as more important in learning than those relating to interaction with others. However, in a later repertory grid, the students who acted as peer facilitators saw interaction with others as a more important element of their learning. There was no comparable change in the perceptions of what was important in learning amongst students who were not involved in peer learning or in the perceptions of what was important in teaching amongst all students. These findings are explained with reference to recent developments in the student-learning literature. Their implications are explored both in terms of helping students to develop a greater understanding of their roles as learners and in offering an additional dimension with which to explore students' learning

U2 - 10.1080/13596740300200137

DO - 10.1080/13596740300200137

M3 - Journal article

VL - 8

SP - 5

EP - 18

JO - Research in Post-Compulsory Education

JF - Research in Post-Compulsory Education

SN - 1359-6748

IS - 1

ER -