Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Persuasive Health

Electronic data

  • Persuasive Health: Back to the Future

    Rights statement: © ACM, 2019. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of ACM for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Proceedings of the 13th EAI International Conference on Pervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare, 2019 http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/3329189.3329245

    Accepted author manuscript, 727 KB, PDF-document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Persuasive Health: Back to the Future

Research output: Contribution in Book/Report/Proceedings - With ISBN/ISSNConference contribution/Paper

Published
Publication date20/05/2019
Host publicationPervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare (PervasiveHealth) Conference, 2019: IMPACT Workshop
PublisherACM
Pages426-434
Number of pages9
ISBN (Print)9781450361262
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

With individual behaviour and lifestyle determining 30-50% of people’s health, research and supportive technology for affecting behaviour alteration remain urgently needed. Most existing persuasive systems are designed to persuade a user to change a finite set of behaviours to achieve a specific goal. However, if the user’s situation or goal changes, such systems cannot adapt to the changes. A much more robust type of persuasive systems is needed today to enable adequate health navigation and to empower people to face and change their own realities in terms of a large variety of health behaviours and lifestyles. In this paper, we provide a perspective on the impressive body of work contributed over the past 15 years, to better look into the future of persuasive health and to the opportunities a broader theoretical framework and practical methodologies may bring about. We present a taxonomy that attempts to explain the contributions in this field including health behaviour theory, cybernetic action behaviour models, social cognitive theory, and control theory. We identify potentially promising approaches to advance persuasive health’s efficacy in empowering individuals to improve their own health outcomes.

Bibliographic note

© ACM, 2019. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of ACM for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Proceedings of the 13th EAI International Conference on Pervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare, 2019 http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/3329189.3329245