Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Place of death : analysis of cancer deaths in p...
View graph of relations

Place of death : analysis of cancer deaths in part of North West England.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article


<mark>Journal publication date</mark>03/2003
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Public Health Medicine
Issue number1
Number of pages6
Pages (from-to)53-58
<mark>Original language</mark>English


Background Relatively little work of a detailed geographical nature has been undertaken on the distribution of place of death. In particular, given evidence that most cancer patients would prefer to die at home there is a need to examine the extent to which this preference is met differentially from place to place. Methods Using data on cancer deaths for a single Health Authority in North West England we conducted both small area and individual analyses of place of death, using binomial and binary logistic regression models, respectively. Results Results from the small area analysis show that in more deprived areas cancer patients are more likely to die in hospital or hospice, and less likely to die at home, but that the effect disappears for home and hospice deaths once other factors are controlled for. At the individual level, the probability of death at home decreases among those living in deprived areas, whereas the probability of death in hospital increases as area deprivation increases. Age, gender, type of cancer, and proximity to hospital or hospice all have some effect on the probability of dying in a particular setting. Conclusion There is significant place-to-place variation in place of death among cancer patients in part of North West England. However, studies of place of death among cancer patients need to consider the full range of settings and, if examining the impact of deprivation or social class, need to adjust for other factors, including proximity to different settings.

Bibliographic note

The definitive publisher-authenticated version of Gatrell, Anthony C. .. et al., Place of death: analysis of cancer deaths in part of North West England. Journal of Public Health Medicine 2003 25: 53-58 is available online at: http://jpubhealth.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/25/1/53