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  • CDIS_A_1549700

    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Discourse on 31/12/2018, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/01596306.2018.1549700

    Accepted author manuscript, 292 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 1/07/20

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Politics by other means?: STS and research in education

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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Politics by other means? STS and research in education. / Gorur, R.; Hamilton, M.; Lundahl, C.; Sjödin, E.S.

In: Discourse, Vol. 40, No. 1, 2019.

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Gorur, R. ; Hamilton, M. ; Lundahl, C. ; Sjödin, E.S. / Politics by other means? STS and research in education. In: Discourse. 2019 ; Vol. 40, No. 1.

Bibtex

@article{347f869e3e064a548ac7befc0c17ea8c,
title = "Politics by other means?: STS and research in education",
abstract = "Science and Technology Studies (STS) has been surprisingly slow to become widely known and deployed in the field of education. Yet STS has a rich array of concepts and analytical methods to offer to studies of: knowledge practices and epistemic cultures; the interrelationship between states and knowledge; regulatory practices, governance and institutions; and classrooms, pedagogy, teaching and learning. Most importantly, it provides a fresh perspective on how power operates in ordering societies, disciplining actors and promoting ideas and practices. In this paper, we provide an introduction to STS and elaborate what it offers education scholars. Using examples from the emerging body of STS work in the field of education, and in particular from the papers in this special issue, we argue that STS is not only useful, but an exciting and generative form of critique–one that is especially suited to investigating contemporary issues in education policies and practices.",
keywords = "Actor-Network Theory (ANT), education, knowledge practices, politics of the mundane, Science and Technology Studies (STS)",
author = "R. Gorur and M. Hamilton and C. Lundahl and E.S. Sj{\"o}din",
note = "This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Discourse on 31/12/2018, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/01596306.2018.1549700",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1080/01596306.2018.1549700",
language = "English",
volume = "40",
journal = "Discourse",
issn = "0159-6306",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Politics by other means?

T2 - STS and research in education

AU - Gorur, R.

AU - Hamilton, M.

AU - Lundahl, C.

AU - Sjödin, E.S.

N1 - This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Discourse on 31/12/2018, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/01596306.2018.1549700

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Science and Technology Studies (STS) has been surprisingly slow to become widely known and deployed in the field of education. Yet STS has a rich array of concepts and analytical methods to offer to studies of: knowledge practices and epistemic cultures; the interrelationship between states and knowledge; regulatory practices, governance and institutions; and classrooms, pedagogy, teaching and learning. Most importantly, it provides a fresh perspective on how power operates in ordering societies, disciplining actors and promoting ideas and practices. In this paper, we provide an introduction to STS and elaborate what it offers education scholars. Using examples from the emerging body of STS work in the field of education, and in particular from the papers in this special issue, we argue that STS is not only useful, but an exciting and generative form of critique–one that is especially suited to investigating contemporary issues in education policies and practices.

AB - Science and Technology Studies (STS) has been surprisingly slow to become widely known and deployed in the field of education. Yet STS has a rich array of concepts and analytical methods to offer to studies of: knowledge practices and epistemic cultures; the interrelationship between states and knowledge; regulatory practices, governance and institutions; and classrooms, pedagogy, teaching and learning. Most importantly, it provides a fresh perspective on how power operates in ordering societies, disciplining actors and promoting ideas and practices. In this paper, we provide an introduction to STS and elaborate what it offers education scholars. Using examples from the emerging body of STS work in the field of education, and in particular from the papers in this special issue, we argue that STS is not only useful, but an exciting and generative form of critique–one that is especially suited to investigating contemporary issues in education policies and practices.

KW - Actor-Network Theory (ANT)

KW - education

KW - knowledge practices

KW - politics of the mundane

KW - Science and Technology Studies (STS)

U2 - 10.1080/01596306.2018.1549700

DO - 10.1080/01596306.2018.1549700

M3 - Journal article

VL - 40

JO - Discourse

JF - Discourse

SN - 0159-6306

IS - 1

ER -