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  • 201703_Manuscript_PAHs_in_the_Arctic_sediment

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Environmental Pollution. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Environmental Pollution, 227, 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.envpol.2017.04.087

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Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ocean sediments from the North Pacific to the Arctic Ocean

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>08/2017
<mark>Journal</mark>Environmental Pollution
Volume227
Number of pages7
Pages (from-to)498-504
Publication statusPublished
Early online date8/05/17
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Abstract Eighteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured in surficial sediments along a marine transect from the North Pacific into the Arctic Ocean. The highest average Σ18PAHs concentrations were observed along the continental slope of the Canada Basin in the Arctic (68.3 ± 8.5 ng g−1 dw), followed by sediments in the Chukchi Sea shelf (49.7 ± 21.2 ng g−1 dw) and Bering Sea (39.5 ± 11.3 ng g−1 dw), while the Bering Strait (16.8 ± 7.1 ng g−1 dw) and Central Arctic Ocean sediments (13.1 ± 9.6 ng g−1 dw) had relatively lower average concentrations. The use of principal components analysis with multiple linear regression (PCA/MLR) indicated that on average oil related or petrogenic sources contributed ∼42% of the measured PAHs in the sediments and marked by higher concentrations of two methylnaphthalenes over the non-alkylated parent PAH, naphthalene. Wood and coal combustion contributed ∼32%, and high temperature pyrogenic sources contributing ∼26%. Petrogenic sources, such as oil seeps, allochthonous coal and coastally eroded material such as terrigenous sediments particularly affected the Chukchi Sea shelf and slope of the Canada Basin, while biomass and coal combustion sources appeared to have greater influence in the central Arctic Ocean, possibly due to the effects of episodic summertime forest fires.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Environmental Pollution. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Environmental Pollution, 227, 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.envpol.2017.04.087