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    Rights statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article:McIlraith, A. L., and Language and Reading Research Consortium (2018) Predicting word reading ability: a quantile regression study. Journal of Research in Reading, 41: 79–96. doi: 10.1111/1467-9817.12089 which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1467-9817.12089/abstract This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

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    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Predicting word reading ability: a quantile regression study

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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  • Autumn McIlraith
  • Language and Reading Research Consortium (LARRC)
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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>02/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Research in Reading
Issue number1
Volume41
Number of pages18
Pages (from-to)79-96
Publication statusPublished
Early online date18/10/16
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Predictors of early word reading are well established. However, it is unclear if these predictors hold for readers across a range of word reading abilities. This study used quantile regression to investigate predictive relationships at different points in the distribution of word reading. Quantile regression analyses used preschool and kindergarten measures of letter knowledge, phonological awareness, rapid automatised naming, sentence repetition, vocabulary and mother’s education to predict first-grade word reading. Predictors generally varied in significance across levels of word reading. Notably, rapid automatised naming was a significant unique predictor for average and good readers but not poor readers. Letter knowledge was generally a stronger unique predictor for poor and average readers than good readers. Well-known word reading predictors varied in significance at different points along the word read-
ing distribution. Results have implications for early identification and statistical analyses of reading-related outcomes.

Bibliographic note

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article:McIlraith, A. L., and Language and Reading Research Consortium (2018) Predicting word reading ability: a quantile regression study. Journal of Research in Reading, 41: 79–96. doi: 10.1111/1467-9817.12089 which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1467-9817.12089/abstract This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.