Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Predictors and mediators of trait anger across ...

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Predictors and mediators of trait anger across the psychosis continuum: The role of attachment style, paranoia and social cognition

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published

Standard

Predictors and mediators of trait anger across the psychosis continuum : The role of attachment style, paranoia and social cognition. / Darrell-Berry, H.; Bucci, S.; Palmier-Claus, J.; Emsley, R.; Drake, R.; Berry, K.

In: Psychiatry Research, Vol. 249, 2017, p. 132-138.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Darrell-Berry, H. ; Bucci, S. ; Palmier-Claus, J. ; Emsley, R. ; Drake, R. ; Berry, K. / Predictors and mediators of trait anger across the psychosis continuum : The role of attachment style, paranoia and social cognition. In: Psychiatry Research. 2017 ; Vol. 249. pp. 132-138.

Bibtex

@article{78fe3e28cede4f08a88f6ec8e0ac1ccd,
title = "Predictors and mediators of trait anger across the psychosis continuum: The role of attachment style, paranoia and social cognition",
abstract = "Anger in the context of psychosis has a significant impact on treatment outcomes and serious implications for risk management. Understanding mechanisms underlying anger will improve interventions and inform strategies for prevention. This study is the first to examine the relationships between anger and key theoretical drivers across different phases of the psychosis continuum. A battery including measures of theory of mind, attachment, hostile attribution bias, paranoia and anger was administered to 174 participants (14 ultra-high risk, 20 first-episode, 20 established psychosis, 120 non-clinical participants). We tested the model that insecure attachment, paranoia, impaired theory of mind and hostile attribution bias would predict trait anger using multiple regression. Attachment avoidance, paranoia and hostile attribution bias were significantly associated with anger but attachment anxiety and theory of mind were not. Mediation analysis showed that paranoia partially mediated the relationship between avoidant attachment and anger but hostile attribution bias did not. Findings emphasise the importance of interventions targeting paranoia to reduce anger and the potential of preventive strategies focused on attachment relationships in early life or adulthood to reduce adult paranoia and anger.",
keywords = "Theory of mind, Attribution, Paranoia, Anger, Attachment, Psychosis",
author = "H. Darrell-Berry and S. Bucci and J. Palmier-Claus and R. Emsley and R. Drake and K. Berry",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1016/j.psychres.2017.01.007",
language = "English",
volume = "249",
pages = "132--138",
journal = "Psychiatry Research",
issn = "0165-1781",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Predictors and mediators of trait anger across the psychosis continuum

T2 - The role of attachment style, paranoia and social cognition

AU - Darrell-Berry, H.

AU - Bucci, S.

AU - Palmier-Claus, J.

AU - Emsley, R.

AU - Drake, R.

AU - Berry, K.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Anger in the context of psychosis has a significant impact on treatment outcomes and serious implications for risk management. Understanding mechanisms underlying anger will improve interventions and inform strategies for prevention. This study is the first to examine the relationships between anger and key theoretical drivers across different phases of the psychosis continuum. A battery including measures of theory of mind, attachment, hostile attribution bias, paranoia and anger was administered to 174 participants (14 ultra-high risk, 20 first-episode, 20 established psychosis, 120 non-clinical participants). We tested the model that insecure attachment, paranoia, impaired theory of mind and hostile attribution bias would predict trait anger using multiple regression. Attachment avoidance, paranoia and hostile attribution bias were significantly associated with anger but attachment anxiety and theory of mind were not. Mediation analysis showed that paranoia partially mediated the relationship between avoidant attachment and anger but hostile attribution bias did not. Findings emphasise the importance of interventions targeting paranoia to reduce anger and the potential of preventive strategies focused on attachment relationships in early life or adulthood to reduce adult paranoia and anger.

AB - Anger in the context of psychosis has a significant impact on treatment outcomes and serious implications for risk management. Understanding mechanisms underlying anger will improve interventions and inform strategies for prevention. This study is the first to examine the relationships between anger and key theoretical drivers across different phases of the psychosis continuum. A battery including measures of theory of mind, attachment, hostile attribution bias, paranoia and anger was administered to 174 participants (14 ultra-high risk, 20 first-episode, 20 established psychosis, 120 non-clinical participants). We tested the model that insecure attachment, paranoia, impaired theory of mind and hostile attribution bias would predict trait anger using multiple regression. Attachment avoidance, paranoia and hostile attribution bias were significantly associated with anger but attachment anxiety and theory of mind were not. Mediation analysis showed that paranoia partially mediated the relationship between avoidant attachment and anger but hostile attribution bias did not. Findings emphasise the importance of interventions targeting paranoia to reduce anger and the potential of preventive strategies focused on attachment relationships in early life or adulthood to reduce adult paranoia and anger.

KW - Theory of mind

KW - Attribution

KW - Paranoia

KW - Anger

KW - Attachment

KW - Psychosis

U2 - 10.1016/j.psychres.2017.01.007

DO - 10.1016/j.psychres.2017.01.007

M3 - Journal article

VL - 249

SP - 132

EP - 138

JO - Psychiatry Research

JF - Psychiatry Research

SN - 0165-1781

ER -