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Protos: foundations for engineering innovative sociotechnical systems

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Published
  • Amit K. Chopra
  • Fabiano Dalpiaz
  • F. Basak Aydemir
  • Paolo Giorgini
  • John Mylopoulos
  • Munindar P. Singh
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Publication date08/2014
Host publicationRequirements Engineering Conference (RE), 2014 IEEE 22nd International
PublisherIEEE
Pages53-62
Number of pages10
ISBN (Print)9781479930319
Original languageEnglish
Event2014 IEEE 22nd International Requirements Engineering Conference (RE) - Karlskrona, Sweden, United Kingdom
Duration: 25/08/201429/08/2014

Conference

Conference2014 IEEE 22nd International Requirements Engineering Conference (RE)
CountryUnited Kingdom
Period25/08/1429/08/14

Conference

Conference2014 IEEE 22nd International Requirements Engineering Conference (RE)
CountryUnited Kingdom
Period25/08/1429/08/14

Abstract

We address the challenge of requirements engineering for sociotechnical systems, wherein humans and organizations supported by technical artifacts such as software interact with one another. Traditional requirements models emphasize the goals of the stakeholders above their interactions. However, the participants in a sociotechnical system may not adopt the goals of the stakeholders involved in its specification. We motivate, Protos, a requirements engineering approach that gives prominence to the interactions of autonomous parties and specifies a sociotechnical system in terms of its participants' social relationships, specifically, commitments. The participants can adopt any goal they like, a key basis for innovative behavior, as long as they interact according to the commitments. Protos describes an abstract requirements engineering process as a series of refinements that seek to satisfy stakeholder requirements by incrementally expanding a specification set and an assumption set, and reducing requirements until all requirements are accommodated. We demonstrate this process via the London Ambulance System described in the literature.