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Putting our money where their mouth is: alignment of charitable aims with charity investments – tensions in policy and practice

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Putting our money where their mouth is : alignment of charitable aims with charity investments – tensions in policy and practice. / Kreander, Niklas; Beattie, Vivien; Mcphail, Ken.

In: British Accounting Review, Vol. 41, No. 3, 01.09.2009, p. 154-168.

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Kreander, Niklas ; Beattie, Vivien ; Mcphail, Ken. / Putting our money where their mouth is : alignment of charitable aims with charity investments – tensions in policy and practice. In: British Accounting Review. 2009 ; Vol. 41, No. 3. pp. 154-168.

Bibtex

@article{a6b7aadd97d742d38f6731bf75c91e18,
title = "Putting our money where their mouth is: alignment of charitable aims with charity investments – tensions in policy and practice",
abstract = "Given the values-driven nature of the mission of most charities, it might be expected that investment behaviour would be similarly values-driven. This paper documents the ethical investment policies and practices of the largest UK charities and explores how these are aligned with the charitable aims, drawing upon accountability, behavioural and managerial perspectives as theoretical lenses. The study employs two distinct research methods: responses to a postal questionnaire and follow-up semi-structured interviews with selected charities. The evidence indicates that a significant minority of large charities do not have a written ethical investment policy. Charities with larger investments, fundraising charities and religious charities were more likely to have a written ethical policy. We suggest that there is a pressing need for improved alignment between charities' aims and their investment practices and better monitoring of investment policies. ",
keywords = "Charity, Ethical investment , Evidence-based policy-making , Dissonance , Values alignment",
author = "Niklas Kreander and Vivien Beattie and Ken Mcphail",
year = "2009",
month = sep,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.bar.2009.06.001",
language = "English",
volume = "41",
pages = "154--168",
journal = "British Accounting Review",
issn = "0890-8389",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Putting our money where their mouth is

T2 - alignment of charitable aims with charity investments – tensions in policy and practice

AU - Kreander, Niklas

AU - Beattie, Vivien

AU - Mcphail, Ken

PY - 2009/9/1

Y1 - 2009/9/1

N2 - Given the values-driven nature of the mission of most charities, it might be expected that investment behaviour would be similarly values-driven. This paper documents the ethical investment policies and practices of the largest UK charities and explores how these are aligned with the charitable aims, drawing upon accountability, behavioural and managerial perspectives as theoretical lenses. The study employs two distinct research methods: responses to a postal questionnaire and follow-up semi-structured interviews with selected charities. The evidence indicates that a significant minority of large charities do not have a written ethical investment policy. Charities with larger investments, fundraising charities and religious charities were more likely to have a written ethical policy. We suggest that there is a pressing need for improved alignment between charities' aims and their investment practices and better monitoring of investment policies.

AB - Given the values-driven nature of the mission of most charities, it might be expected that investment behaviour would be similarly values-driven. This paper documents the ethical investment policies and practices of the largest UK charities and explores how these are aligned with the charitable aims, drawing upon accountability, behavioural and managerial perspectives as theoretical lenses. The study employs two distinct research methods: responses to a postal questionnaire and follow-up semi-structured interviews with selected charities. The evidence indicates that a significant minority of large charities do not have a written ethical investment policy. Charities with larger investments, fundraising charities and religious charities were more likely to have a written ethical policy. We suggest that there is a pressing need for improved alignment between charities' aims and their investment practices and better monitoring of investment policies.

KW - Charity

KW - Ethical investment

KW - Evidence-based policy-making

KW - Dissonance

KW - Values alignment

U2 - 10.1016/j.bar.2009.06.001

DO - 10.1016/j.bar.2009.06.001

M3 - Journal article

VL - 41

SP - 154

EP - 168

JO - British Accounting Review

JF - British Accounting Review

SN - 0890-8389

IS - 3

ER -