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  • Smail et al 2019 - AAM

    Rights statement: This is an Author’s Accepted Manuscript version of an article published by Edinburgh University Press in the International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing (2019, vol. 13, pp. 28-38). The Version of Record is available online at: https://www.euppublishing.com/doi/full/10.3366/ijhac.2019.0229

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Qualitative Geographies in Digital Texts: Representing historical spatial identities in the Lake District

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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Qualitative Geographies in Digital Texts : Representing historical spatial identities in the Lake District. / Smail, Robert; Gregory, Ian; Taylor, Joanna.

In: International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing, Vol. 13, No. 1-2, 31.10.2019, p. 28-38.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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Smail, Robert ; Gregory, Ian ; Taylor, Joanna. / Qualitative Geographies in Digital Texts : Representing historical spatial identities in the Lake District. In: International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing. 2019 ; Vol. 13, No. 1-2. pp. 28-38.

Bibtex

@article{6e5a5bcd241c45b586c34e96df166653,
title = "Qualitative Geographies in Digital Texts: Representing historical spatial identities in the Lake District",
abstract = "Techniques for extracting place names (toponyms) from texts and using them to conduct analyses of the geographies within the texts are becoming reasonably well established. These are generally referred to as Geographical Text Analysis (GTA) and allow us to ask questions about the geographies within a corpus. The limitation of this approach is that the geographies that can be uncovered are solely associated with toponyms for which a coordinate-based location can be assigned. While this method is valuable, it is effectively a quantitative representation of the geographies associated with named places. Other representations of geography are ignored. To complement GTA, we need to develop techniques that are capable of representing the more qualitative representations of geography that are found within texts. Drawing on the Corpus of Lake District Writing, this paper presents some initial ideas about how this can be achieved, primarily by using techniques from corpus linguistics.",
author = "Robert Smail and Ian Gregory and Joanna Taylor",
note = "This is an Author{\textquoteright}s Accepted Manuscript version of an article published by Edinburgh University Press in the International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing (2019, vol. 13, pp. 28-38). The Version of Record is available online at: https://www.euppublishing.com/doi/full/10.3366/ijhac.2019.0229 ",
year = "2019",
month = oct
day = "31",
doi = "10.3366/ijhac.2019.0229",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
pages = "28--38",
journal = "International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing",
issn = "1753-8548",
publisher = "Edinburgh University Press",
number = "1-2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Qualitative Geographies in Digital Texts

T2 - Representing historical spatial identities in the Lake District

AU - Smail, Robert

AU - Gregory, Ian

AU - Taylor, Joanna

N1 - This is an Author’s Accepted Manuscript version of an article published by Edinburgh University Press in the International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing (2019, vol. 13, pp. 28-38). The Version of Record is available online at: https://www.euppublishing.com/doi/full/10.3366/ijhac.2019.0229

PY - 2019/10/31

Y1 - 2019/10/31

N2 - Techniques for extracting place names (toponyms) from texts and using them to conduct analyses of the geographies within the texts are becoming reasonably well established. These are generally referred to as Geographical Text Analysis (GTA) and allow us to ask questions about the geographies within a corpus. The limitation of this approach is that the geographies that can be uncovered are solely associated with toponyms for which a coordinate-based location can be assigned. While this method is valuable, it is effectively a quantitative representation of the geographies associated with named places. Other representations of geography are ignored. To complement GTA, we need to develop techniques that are capable of representing the more qualitative representations of geography that are found within texts. Drawing on the Corpus of Lake District Writing, this paper presents some initial ideas about how this can be achieved, primarily by using techniques from corpus linguistics.

AB - Techniques for extracting place names (toponyms) from texts and using them to conduct analyses of the geographies within the texts are becoming reasonably well established. These are generally referred to as Geographical Text Analysis (GTA) and allow us to ask questions about the geographies within a corpus. The limitation of this approach is that the geographies that can be uncovered are solely associated with toponyms for which a coordinate-based location can be assigned. While this method is valuable, it is effectively a quantitative representation of the geographies associated with named places. Other representations of geography are ignored. To complement GTA, we need to develop techniques that are capable of representing the more qualitative representations of geography that are found within texts. Drawing on the Corpus of Lake District Writing, this paper presents some initial ideas about how this can be achieved, primarily by using techniques from corpus linguistics.

U2 - 10.3366/ijhac.2019.0229

DO - 10.3366/ijhac.2019.0229

M3 - Journal article

VL - 13

SP - 28

EP - 38

JO - International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing

JF - International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing

SN - 1753-8548

IS - 1-2

ER -