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Quantification of hydrogen trapping in multiphase steels: Part II – Effect of austenite morphology

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Quantification of hydrogen trapping in multiphase steels : Part II – Effect of austenite morphology. / Turk, A.; Pu, S.D.; Bombač, D.; Rivera-Díaz-del-Castillo, P.E.J.; Galindo-Nava, E.I.

In: Acta Materialia, Vol. 197, 15.09.2020, p. 253-268.

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Turk, A. ; Pu, S.D. ; Bombač, D. ; Rivera-Díaz-del-Castillo, P.E.J. ; Galindo-Nava, E.I. / Quantification of hydrogen trapping in multiphase steels : Part II – Effect of austenite morphology. In: Acta Materialia. 2020 ; Vol. 197. pp. 253-268.

Bibtex

@article{94bdc1c5bc81479c99add1c6fc189bd9,
title = "Quantification of hydrogen trapping in multiphase steels: Part II – Effect of austenite morphology",
abstract = "We tackle the role of austenite in multiphase steels on hydrogen diffusion systematically for the first time, considering a range of factors such as morphology, interface kinetics and the additional effect of point traps using both experiments and modelling. This follows the findings from part I where we showed that austenite cannot be parametrised and modelled as point traps under the assumption of local equilibrium, unlike grain boundaries and dislocations. To solve this, we introduce a 2D hydrogen diffusion model accounting for the difference in diffusivities and solubilities between the phases. We first revisit the as-quenched martensite permeation results from part I and show that the extremely low H diffusivity there can be partly explained with the new description of austenite but is partly likely due to quench vacancies. We then also look at the H absorption and desorption rates in a duplex steel as a case study using a combination of simulations and experiments. The rates are shown to depend heavily on austenite morphology and the kinetics of H transition from ferrite to austenite and that an energy barrier is likely associated to this transition. We show that H diffusion through the ferrite matrix and austenite islands proceeds at similar rates and the assumption of negligible concentration gradients in ferrite occasionally applied in the literature is a poor approximation. This approach is also applicable to other austenite-containing steels as well as other multiphase alloys.",
keywords = "Austenite, Duplex stainless steel, Hydrogen desorption, Hydrogen diffusion, Hydrogen permeation, Interface diffusion, Advanced high strength Steel, Diffusion, Ferrite, Grain boundaries, Hydrogen, Morphology, Concentration gradients, Ferrite matrix, H absorption, Hydrogen trapping, Interface kinetics, Local equilibrium, Multi phase alloys",
author = "A. Turk and S.D. Pu and D. Bomba{\v c} and P.E.J. Rivera-D{\'i}az-del-Castillo and E.I. Galindo-Nava",
year = "2020",
month = sep,
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/j.actamat.2020.07.039",
language = "English",
volume = "197",
pages = "253--268",
journal = "Acta Materialia",
issn = "1359-6454",
publisher = "PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Quantification of hydrogen trapping in multiphase steels

T2 - Part II – Effect of austenite morphology

AU - Turk, A.

AU - Pu, S.D.

AU - Bombač, D.

AU - Rivera-Díaz-del-Castillo, P.E.J.

AU - Galindo-Nava, E.I.

PY - 2020/9/15

Y1 - 2020/9/15

N2 - We tackle the role of austenite in multiphase steels on hydrogen diffusion systematically for the first time, considering a range of factors such as morphology, interface kinetics and the additional effect of point traps using both experiments and modelling. This follows the findings from part I where we showed that austenite cannot be parametrised and modelled as point traps under the assumption of local equilibrium, unlike grain boundaries and dislocations. To solve this, we introduce a 2D hydrogen diffusion model accounting for the difference in diffusivities and solubilities between the phases. We first revisit the as-quenched martensite permeation results from part I and show that the extremely low H diffusivity there can be partly explained with the new description of austenite but is partly likely due to quench vacancies. We then also look at the H absorption and desorption rates in a duplex steel as a case study using a combination of simulations and experiments. The rates are shown to depend heavily on austenite morphology and the kinetics of H transition from ferrite to austenite and that an energy barrier is likely associated to this transition. We show that H diffusion through the ferrite matrix and austenite islands proceeds at similar rates and the assumption of negligible concentration gradients in ferrite occasionally applied in the literature is a poor approximation. This approach is also applicable to other austenite-containing steels as well as other multiphase alloys.

AB - We tackle the role of austenite in multiphase steels on hydrogen diffusion systematically for the first time, considering a range of factors such as morphology, interface kinetics and the additional effect of point traps using both experiments and modelling. This follows the findings from part I where we showed that austenite cannot be parametrised and modelled as point traps under the assumption of local equilibrium, unlike grain boundaries and dislocations. To solve this, we introduce a 2D hydrogen diffusion model accounting for the difference in diffusivities and solubilities between the phases. We first revisit the as-quenched martensite permeation results from part I and show that the extremely low H diffusivity there can be partly explained with the new description of austenite but is partly likely due to quench vacancies. We then also look at the H absorption and desorption rates in a duplex steel as a case study using a combination of simulations and experiments. The rates are shown to depend heavily on austenite morphology and the kinetics of H transition from ferrite to austenite and that an energy barrier is likely associated to this transition. We show that H diffusion through the ferrite matrix and austenite islands proceeds at similar rates and the assumption of negligible concentration gradients in ferrite occasionally applied in the literature is a poor approximation. This approach is also applicable to other austenite-containing steels as well as other multiphase alloys.

KW - Austenite

KW - Duplex stainless steel

KW - Hydrogen desorption

KW - Hydrogen diffusion

KW - Hydrogen permeation

KW - Interface diffusion

KW - Advanced high strength Steel

KW - Diffusion

KW - Ferrite

KW - Grain boundaries

KW - Hydrogen

KW - Morphology

KW - Concentration gradients

KW - Ferrite matrix

KW - H absorption

KW - Hydrogen trapping

KW - Interface kinetics

KW - Local equilibrium

KW - Multi phase alloys

U2 - 10.1016/j.actamat.2020.07.039

DO - 10.1016/j.actamat.2020.07.039

M3 - Journal article

VL - 197

SP - 253

EP - 268

JO - Acta Materialia

JF - Acta Materialia

SN - 1359-6454

ER -