12,000

We have over 12,000 students, from over 100 countries, within one of the safest campuses in the UK

93%

93% of Lancaster students go into work or further study within six months of graduating

Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Reconstructing normality
View graph of relations

« Back

Reconstructing normality: the use of infrastructure leftovers in crisis situations as inspiration for the design of resilient technology

Research output: Contribution in Book/Report/ProceedingsPaper

Published

Publication date2013
Host publicationOzCHI '13 Proceedings of the 25th Australian Computer-Human Interaction Conference: Augmentation, Application, Innovation, Collaboration
Place of publicationNew York
PublisherACM
Pages457-466
Number of pages10
ISBN (Print)9781450325257
Original languageEnglish

Conference

ConferenceAustralian Computer-Human Interaction Conference (OzCHI'13)
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityAdelaide
Period25/11/1329/01/14

Conference

ConferenceAustralian Computer-Human Interaction Conference (OzCHI'13)
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityAdelaide
Period25/11/1329/01/14

Abstract

In this paper, we examine challenges people face in situations of disrupted network infrastructures and how people use surviving portions of technology to cope with these challenges. We show how an important aspect in crises is the disturbance of services caused by disruptions in underlying technological structures. In such situations, people resort to all possible means to "reconstruct normality" in the sense of restoring their ability to communicate. For doing so, people often make creative use of the remains of the technological landscape. Building on the analysis of interviews with crises witnesses and first responders, external reports and scientific literature, we propose and describe three categories of mechanisms involving the creative use of surviving technology in crisis situations. We argue that studying these mechanisms can provide a key source of inspiration to define qualities of resilient architectures, and use these mechanisms as creative input to propose architectural qualities that can potentially make communication systems more resilient in the face of crises.