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Representing Vernacular Landscape in New Towns

Research output: Contribution to conference - Without ISBN/ISSN Conference paper

Published

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Representing Vernacular Landscape in New Towns. / Cureton, Paul Henry.

2014. Paper presented at European Council of Landscape Architecture Schools, Porto, Portugal.

Research output: Contribution to conference - Without ISBN/ISSN Conference paper

Harvard

Cureton, PH 2014, 'Representing Vernacular Landscape in New Towns', Paper presented at European Council of Landscape Architecture Schools, Porto, Portugal, 21/09/14 - 23/09/14.

APA

Cureton, P. H. (2014). Representing Vernacular Landscape in New Towns. Paper presented at European Council of Landscape Architecture Schools, Porto, Portugal.

Vancouver

Cureton PH. Representing Vernacular Landscape in New Towns. 2014. Paper presented at European Council of Landscape Architecture Schools, Porto, Portugal.

Author

Cureton, Paul Henry. / Representing Vernacular Landscape in New Towns. Paper presented at European Council of Landscape Architecture Schools, Porto, Portugal.

Bibtex

@conference{bc9243de797e454798ed80e0011c9ceb,
title = "Representing Vernacular Landscape in New Towns",
abstract = "Considering the vernacular landscape of some of the first wave New Towns in the UK; Welwyn Garden City, Stevenage and Harlow and four housing districts, the areas have developed specific identities and cultivation practices of inhabitants from everyday use. However, there is sometimes a design paradox as landscape constantly changes though its representation remains static (Ruddick in Harris 1997, pp.107–112). To address the landscape character is a great challenge as this involves the representation of time in which landscape form constantly morphs (Jackson, 1994, pp. 3–7). Using derived representational practices which record sequences and movements; {\textquoteleft}motation{\textquoteright}, remote sensing, and cinematography, the author argues that these are essential in providing the greatest range and data to urban landscape form (Halprin, 1965, Girot in Waldheim, 2006 pp.87-104)). To this extent, the choreography of landscape representation is required. ",
keywords = "Landscape Architecture, Landscape, Urban Design, New Towns., urban planning",
author = "Cureton, {Paul Henry}",
year = "2014",
month = sep,
day = "21",
language = "English",
note = "European Council of Landscape Architecture Schools : A place of cultivation ; Conference date: 21-09-2014 Through 23-09-2014",
url = "http://www.eclas.org/index.php/activities/eclas-annual-conferences/28-eclas-conference-2014",

}

RIS

TY - CONF

T1 - Representing Vernacular Landscape in New Towns

AU - Cureton, Paul Henry

PY - 2014/9/21

Y1 - 2014/9/21

N2 - Considering the vernacular landscape of some of the first wave New Towns in the UK; Welwyn Garden City, Stevenage and Harlow and four housing districts, the areas have developed specific identities and cultivation practices of inhabitants from everyday use. However, there is sometimes a design paradox as landscape constantly changes though its representation remains static (Ruddick in Harris 1997, pp.107–112). To address the landscape character is a great challenge as this involves the representation of time in which landscape form constantly morphs (Jackson, 1994, pp. 3–7). Using derived representational practices which record sequences and movements; ‘motation’, remote sensing, and cinematography, the author argues that these are essential in providing the greatest range and data to urban landscape form (Halprin, 1965, Girot in Waldheim, 2006 pp.87-104)). To this extent, the choreography of landscape representation is required.

AB - Considering the vernacular landscape of some of the first wave New Towns in the UK; Welwyn Garden City, Stevenage and Harlow and four housing districts, the areas have developed specific identities and cultivation practices of inhabitants from everyday use. However, there is sometimes a design paradox as landscape constantly changes though its representation remains static (Ruddick in Harris 1997, pp.107–112). To address the landscape character is a great challenge as this involves the representation of time in which landscape form constantly morphs (Jackson, 1994, pp. 3–7). Using derived representational practices which record sequences and movements; ‘motation’, remote sensing, and cinematography, the author argues that these are essential in providing the greatest range and data to urban landscape form (Halprin, 1965, Girot in Waldheim, 2006 pp.87-104)). To this extent, the choreography of landscape representation is required.

KW - Landscape Architecture

KW - Landscape

KW - Urban Design

KW - New Towns.

KW - urban planning

M3 - Conference paper

T2 - European Council of Landscape Architecture Schools

Y2 - 21 September 2014 through 23 September 2014

ER -