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  • aging and society jul15

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Aging Studies. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Aging Studies, 35, 2015 DOI: 10.1016/j.jaging.2015.07.007

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Resilience and vision impairment in older people

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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Resilience and vision impairment in older people. / Thetford, Clare; Bennet, Kate; Hodge, Suzanne; Knox, Paul; Robinson, Jude.

In: Journal of Aging Studies, Vol. 35, 12.2015, p. 37-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Thetford, C, Bennet, K, Hodge, S, Knox, P & Robinson, J 2015, 'Resilience and vision impairment in older people', Journal of Aging Studies, vol. 35, pp. 37-48. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaging.2015.07.007

APA

Thetford, C., Bennet, K., Hodge, S., Knox, P., & Robinson, J. (2015). Resilience and vision impairment in older people. Journal of Aging Studies, 35, 37-48. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaging.2015.07.007

Vancouver

Thetford C, Bennet K, Hodge S, Knox P, Robinson J. Resilience and vision impairment in older people. Journal of Aging Studies. 2015 Dec;35:37-48. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaging.2015.07.007

Author

Thetford, Clare ; Bennet, Kate ; Hodge, Suzanne ; Knox, Paul ; Robinson, Jude. / Resilience and vision impairment in older people. In: Journal of Aging Studies. 2015 ; Vol. 35. pp. 37-48.

Bibtex

@article{39e11f04ebf1422eb63740f9665ac60a,
title = "Resilience and vision impairment in older people",
abstract = "Some people fare better than others when faced with adversity; they appear to be more {\textquoteleft}resilient{\textquoteright}. This article explores the concept of resilience in the context of vision impairment using two linked sets of narrative interview data from 2007 to 2010. Three case studies were analysed in detail using a framework approach based upon a social–ecological model of resilience and vision impairment. Within the model a range of assets and resources are identified which influence an individual's capacity for resilience. A set of criteria were used to establish the extent to which each individual appeared to be resilient at each point in time. Analysis revealed that it is not merely the presence or absence of individual, social, and community resources – but how these resources interact with each other – that influences resilience and can create a risk to wellbeing. To possess only some of these resources is not sufficient; there is a co-dependency between these resources which requires the presence of other resources for resilience to be achieved. Resilience is not a fixed state; individuals can become more or less resilient as their circumstances and resources change over time. We suggest that the concept of resilience has much to offer the field of vision impairment as it allows the identification of enablers as well as areas of barriers to improving people's health and wellbeing and suggests further opportunities for service providers to engage with clients, even those who appear to be supported, as people's social, economic and emotional landscapes continue to change over time, rather than identifying deficit.",
keywords = "Resilience, Successful ageing, Visual/vision impairment, AMD, Older people, Sight loss",
author = "Clare Thetford and Kate Bennet and Suzanne Hodge and Paul Knox and Jude Robinson",
note = "This is the author{\textquoteright}s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Aging Studies. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Aging Studies, 35, 2015 DOI: 10.1016/j.jaging.2015.07.007",
year = "2015",
month = dec
doi = "10.1016/j.jaging.2015.07.007",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "37--48",
journal = "Journal of Aging Studies",
issn = "0890-4065",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Resilience and vision impairment in older people

AU - Thetford, Clare

AU - Bennet, Kate

AU - Hodge, Suzanne

AU - Knox, Paul

AU - Robinson, Jude

N1 - This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Aging Studies. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Aging Studies, 35, 2015 DOI: 10.1016/j.jaging.2015.07.007

PY - 2015/12

Y1 - 2015/12

N2 - Some people fare better than others when faced with adversity; they appear to be more ‘resilient’. This article explores the concept of resilience in the context of vision impairment using two linked sets of narrative interview data from 2007 to 2010. Three case studies were analysed in detail using a framework approach based upon a social–ecological model of resilience and vision impairment. Within the model a range of assets and resources are identified which influence an individual's capacity for resilience. A set of criteria were used to establish the extent to which each individual appeared to be resilient at each point in time. Analysis revealed that it is not merely the presence or absence of individual, social, and community resources – but how these resources interact with each other – that influences resilience and can create a risk to wellbeing. To possess only some of these resources is not sufficient; there is a co-dependency between these resources which requires the presence of other resources for resilience to be achieved. Resilience is not a fixed state; individuals can become more or less resilient as their circumstances and resources change over time. We suggest that the concept of resilience has much to offer the field of vision impairment as it allows the identification of enablers as well as areas of barriers to improving people's health and wellbeing and suggests further opportunities for service providers to engage with clients, even those who appear to be supported, as people's social, economic and emotional landscapes continue to change over time, rather than identifying deficit.

AB - Some people fare better than others when faced with adversity; they appear to be more ‘resilient’. This article explores the concept of resilience in the context of vision impairment using two linked sets of narrative interview data from 2007 to 2010. Three case studies were analysed in detail using a framework approach based upon a social–ecological model of resilience and vision impairment. Within the model a range of assets and resources are identified which influence an individual's capacity for resilience. A set of criteria were used to establish the extent to which each individual appeared to be resilient at each point in time. Analysis revealed that it is not merely the presence or absence of individual, social, and community resources – but how these resources interact with each other – that influences resilience and can create a risk to wellbeing. To possess only some of these resources is not sufficient; there is a co-dependency between these resources which requires the presence of other resources for resilience to be achieved. Resilience is not a fixed state; individuals can become more or less resilient as their circumstances and resources change over time. We suggest that the concept of resilience has much to offer the field of vision impairment as it allows the identification of enablers as well as areas of barriers to improving people's health and wellbeing and suggests further opportunities for service providers to engage with clients, even those who appear to be supported, as people's social, economic and emotional landscapes continue to change over time, rather than identifying deficit.

KW - Resilience

KW - Successful ageing

KW - Visual/vision impairment

KW - AMD

KW - Older people

KW - Sight loss

U2 - 10.1016/j.jaging.2015.07.007

DO - 10.1016/j.jaging.2015.07.007

M3 - Journal article

VL - 35

SP - 37

EP - 48

JO - Journal of Aging Studies

JF - Journal of Aging Studies

SN - 0890-4065

ER -