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Retaining health carers: the role of personal and organisation job resources

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>3/06/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance
Issue number2
Volume6
Number of pages16
Pages (from-to)98-113
Publication statusPublished
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify key personal and organisational resources that influence the engagement, well-being and job satisfaction of healthcare professionals working in Australia. 

Design/methodology/approach: Using the job demands–resources model, this study investigates how employee resources and organisation resources influence engagement, well-being and job satisfaction of health professionals in Australian hospitals. The authors collected survey data from a sample of healthcare professionals (n=217) working in three hospitals in New South Wales, Australia. 

Findings: The results confirm the importance of the emotional health of employees on their well-being. The results concur with existing research that employees with higher levels of emotional health have more positive emotional and social interactions, and thus exhibit higher levels of well-being at work. The study also uncovers certain aspects of emotional health that can influence a range of employee outcomes. 

Practical implications: The findings link human resource management practices to unique motivators of healthcare professionals which, in turn, are likely to improve engagement, well-being and job satisfaction. 

Originality/value: The study highlights specific resources that support greater levels of well-being, engagement and job satisfaction in Australian hospitals.

Bibliographic note

This article is (c) Emerald Group Publishing and permission has been granted for this version to appear here. Emerald does not grant permission for this article to be further copied/distributed or hosted elsewhere without the express permission from Emerald Group Publishing Limited.