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    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Global Public Heath on 22/10/2020, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17441692.2020.1836246

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Risk factors for self-reported cataract symptoms, diagnosis, and surgery uptake among older adults in India: Findings from the WHO SAGE data

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>22/10/2020
<mark>Journal</mark>Global Public Health
Number of pages15
Publication StatusE-pub ahead of print
Early online date22/10/20
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Visual impairments have a substantial impact on the well-being of older people, but their impact among older adults in low- and middle-income countries is under-researched. We examined risk factors for self-reported cataract symptoms, diagnosis, and surgery uptake in India.

Cross-sectional data from the nationally representative WHO SAGE data (2007–2008) for India were analysed. We focused on a sub-sample of 6558 adults aged 50+, applying descriptive statistics and logistic regression.

Nearly 1-in-5 respondents self-reported diagnosed cataracts, more than three-fifths (62%; n = 3879) reported cataract symptoms, and over half (51.8%) underwent surgery. Increasing age, self-reported diabetes, arthritis, low visual acuity, and moderate or severe vision problems were factors associated with self-reported diagnosed cataracts. Odds of cataract symptoms were higher with increasing age and among those with self-reported arthritis, depressive symptoms, low visual acuity, and with moderate or severe vision problems. Odds of cataract surgery were also higher with increasing age, self-reported diabetes, depressive symptoms, and among those with low visual acuity.

A public health approach of behavioural modification, well-structured national outreach eye care services, and inclusion of local basic eye care services are recommended.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Global Public Heath on 22/10/2020, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17441692.2020.1836246