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  • COPSYC_2018_211_Revision 1_V0 (1)

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Current Opinion in Psychology. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Current Opinion in Psychology, 28, 2019 DOI: 10.1016/j.copsyc.2018.10.007

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Running too far ahead?: Towards a broader understanding of mindfulness in organizations

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>08/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>Current Opinion in Psychology
Volume28
Number of pages5
Pages (from-to)32-36
Publication statusPublished
Early online date15/10/18
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Current workplace mindfulness research and interventions assume that teaching mindfulness will have beneficial effects for people and organizations. While research shows that mindfulness trainings may increase resilience of working adults, assuming that mindfulness will have independent effects on outcomes at different levels of an organization is not well grounded. We assert that mindfulness training would, however, be beneficial for organizations when tailored to that context and shaped by an understanding of organizational theory and practice. We also envisage mindfulness as a beneficial property of teams, organizations and the individuals who constitute them. To close the evidence gap we propose building multi-level models of mindfulness in organizations, broadening training programs, and developing a novel competency framework for teachers in this context.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Current Opinion in Psychology. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Current Opinion in Psychology, 28, 2019 DOI: 10.1016/j.copsyc.2018.10.007