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  • 190429 Journal SOP Survey v41 (Repository) AAM

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in International Journal of Production Economics. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in International Journal of Production Economics, 214, 2019 DOI: 10.1016/j.ijpe.2019.03.027

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    Embargo ends: 3/10/20

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Sales and Operations Planning: The effect of coordination mechanisms on supply chain performance

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/08/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>International Journal of Production Economics
Volume214
Number of pages15
Pages (from-to)80-94
Publication statusPublished
Early online date3/04/19
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Sales and Operations Planning (S&OP) is a means of facilitating cross-functional coordination, such as across the marketing-operations interface, but adopters of S&OP have not all benefited from S&OP to the same extent. This paper investigates the effect of S&OP on supply chain performance using the perspective of coordination and contingency theories. A structural equation model was developed in which six S&OP coordination mechanisms were hypothesized to contribute to improved supply chain performance. The model was tested using a global survey of 568 experienced S&OP practitioners. Our results indicate that Strategic Alignment and Information Acquisition/Processing are the mechanisms that most significantly enable superior S&OP outcomes. However, we find that a highly formalized S&OP Procedure inhibits supply chain performance. Furthermore, using a contingency theory perspective, increasing firm size and increasing experience in S&OP amplify the negative effect of a standardized S&OP Procedure upon supply chain performance. Our results suggest that organizational bricolage may be a coordinating mechanism of effective S&OP programs and that managers should empower ambidextrous S&OP teams to maintain balance using self-governing event-driven processes. This paper makes a novel contribution to the S&OP literature by providing evidence of a theoretical construct (organizational bricolage), which may trigger a re-evaluation of the efficacy of prescriptive S&OP procedures that have been advocated by some researchers and practitioners. 

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in International Journal of Production Economics. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in International Journal of Production Economics, 214, 2019 DOI: 10.1016/j.ijpe.2019.03.027