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Sectarian Games: Sovereign Power, War Machines and Regional Order in the Middle East

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>16/12/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>Middle East Law and Governance
Issue number3
Volume11
Number of pages36
Pages (from-to)283–318
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date8/11/19
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Amidst violent contestation across the Middle East leaving regimes facing – or fearing – popular protests, the regulation of political life became increasingly important. Across the past century, the development of political projects has been driven by regime efforts to maintain power, constructing regime-society relations in such a way to ensure their survival. As a consequence, security is not given; rather, it reflects the concerns of elites and embeds their concerns within society, using a range of domestic, regional and geopolitical strategies to meet their needs. These strategies play on a range of different fears and currents to locate regime interests within broader concerns. A key part of such efforts involves the cultivation and suppression of particular identities, often resulting in contestation and uncertainty within and between states. Drawing on the ideas of Giorgio Agamben, Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, the article argues that the regulation of sect-based identities – and difference – has been a key part of governance strategies in divided societies across the Middle East, albeit varying across time and space.