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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 151, 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.jecp.2016.02.003

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Semantic processing of actions at 9 months is linked to language proficiency at 9 and 18 months

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Semantic processing of actions at 9 months is linked to language proficiency at 9 and 18 months. / Kaduk, Katharina; Bakker, Marta; Juvrud, Joshua; Gredebäck, Gustaf; Westermann, Gert; Lunn, Judith; Reid, Vincent Michael.

In: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, Vol. 151, 11.2016, p. 96-108.

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Kaduk, Katharina ; Bakker, Marta ; Juvrud, Joshua ; Gredebäck, Gustaf ; Westermann, Gert ; Lunn, Judith ; Reid, Vincent Michael. / Semantic processing of actions at 9 months is linked to language proficiency at 9 and 18 months. In: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. 2016 ; Vol. 151. pp. 96-108.

Bibtex

@article{684ebb8f04df41a1986e571c2b6541a3,
title = "Semantic processing of actions at 9 months is linked to language proficiency at 9 and 18 months",
abstract = "The current study uses event-related potential methodologies to investigate how social–cognitive processes in preverbal infants relate to language performance. We assessed 9-month-olds{\textquoteright} understanding of the semantic structure of actions via an N400 event-related potential (ERP) response to action sequences that contained expected and unexpected outcomes. At 9 and 18 months of age, infants{\textquoteright} language abilities were measured using the Swedish Early Communicative Development Inventory (SECDI). Here we show that 9-month-olds{\textquoteright} understanding of the semantic structure of actions, evidenced in an N400 ERP response to action sequences with unexpected outcomes, is related to language comprehension scores at 9 months and is related to language production scores at 18 months of age. Infants who showed a selective N400 response to unexpected action outcomes are those who are classed as above mean in their language proficiency. The results provide evidence that language performance is related to the ability to detect and interpret human actions at 9 months of age. This study suggests that some basic cognitive mechanisms are involved in the processing of sequential events that are shared between two conceptually different cognitive domains and that pre-linguistic social understanding skills and language proficiency are linked to one another.",
keywords = "Action understanding, Semantic processing, N400, Language acquisition, Nc, ERP",
author = "Katharina Kaduk and Marta Bakker and Joshua Juvrud and Gustaf Gredeb{\"a}ck and Gert Westermann and Judith Lunn and Reid, {Vincent Michael}",
note = "This is the author{\textquoteright}s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 151, 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.jecp.2016.02.003",
year = "2016",
month = nov
doi = "10.1016/j.jecp.2016.02.003",
language = "English",
volume = "151",
pages = "96--108",
journal = "Journal of Experimental Child Psychology",
issn = "0022-0965",
publisher = "ELSEVIER ACADEMIC PRESS INC",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Semantic processing of actions at 9 months is linked to language proficiency at 9 and 18 months

AU - Kaduk, Katharina

AU - Bakker, Marta

AU - Juvrud, Joshua

AU - Gredebäck, Gustaf

AU - Westermann, Gert

AU - Lunn, Judith

AU - Reid, Vincent Michael

N1 - This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 151, 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.jecp.2016.02.003

PY - 2016/11

Y1 - 2016/11

N2 - The current study uses event-related potential methodologies to investigate how social–cognitive processes in preverbal infants relate to language performance. We assessed 9-month-olds’ understanding of the semantic structure of actions via an N400 event-related potential (ERP) response to action sequences that contained expected and unexpected outcomes. At 9 and 18 months of age, infants’ language abilities were measured using the Swedish Early Communicative Development Inventory (SECDI). Here we show that 9-month-olds’ understanding of the semantic structure of actions, evidenced in an N400 ERP response to action sequences with unexpected outcomes, is related to language comprehension scores at 9 months and is related to language production scores at 18 months of age. Infants who showed a selective N400 response to unexpected action outcomes are those who are classed as above mean in their language proficiency. The results provide evidence that language performance is related to the ability to detect and interpret human actions at 9 months of age. This study suggests that some basic cognitive mechanisms are involved in the processing of sequential events that are shared between two conceptually different cognitive domains and that pre-linguistic social understanding skills and language proficiency are linked to one another.

AB - The current study uses event-related potential methodologies to investigate how social–cognitive processes in preverbal infants relate to language performance. We assessed 9-month-olds’ understanding of the semantic structure of actions via an N400 event-related potential (ERP) response to action sequences that contained expected and unexpected outcomes. At 9 and 18 months of age, infants’ language abilities were measured using the Swedish Early Communicative Development Inventory (SECDI). Here we show that 9-month-olds’ understanding of the semantic structure of actions, evidenced in an N400 ERP response to action sequences with unexpected outcomes, is related to language comprehension scores at 9 months and is related to language production scores at 18 months of age. Infants who showed a selective N400 response to unexpected action outcomes are those who are classed as above mean in their language proficiency. The results provide evidence that language performance is related to the ability to detect and interpret human actions at 9 months of age. This study suggests that some basic cognitive mechanisms are involved in the processing of sequential events that are shared between two conceptually different cognitive domains and that pre-linguistic social understanding skills and language proficiency are linked to one another.

KW - Action understanding

KW - Semantic processing

KW - N400

KW - Language acquisition

KW - Nc

KW - ERP

U2 - 10.1016/j.jecp.2016.02.003

DO - 10.1016/j.jecp.2016.02.003

M3 - Special issue

VL - 151

SP - 96

EP - 108

JO - Journal of Experimental Child Psychology

JF - Journal of Experimental Child Psychology

SN - 0022-0965

ER -