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  • Author accepted manuscript_Palo, T., Åkesson, M. & Löfberg, N.

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Business Research. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Business Research, 104, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2018.10.037

    Accepted author manuscript, 1 MB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 1/05/20

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

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Servitization as business model contestation: A practice approach

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/11/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Business Research
Volume104
Number of pages11
Pages (from-to)486-496
Publication statusPublished
Early online date1/11/18
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

In principle, organizations know how to do servitization, but in practice, many struggle to change their business models to include service offerings. To understand this struggle, this paper examines servitization in a large multinational manufacturer within the pulp and paper industry. Utilizing practice theory, the study explicates the servitization process as a contestation of a company's parallel business models — one existing and dominant; one emerging. As business models materialize in organizational practices, and therefore have the potential to frame and organize servitization efforts, the models give rise to contestations in the practices performed by actors in the organization and the ecosystem. The elements of such contestations provide a better understanding of the ways in which practices may be disrupted to support servitization. Contestations can thus be creative instead of problematic. As a result, this paper extends the conceptualization of servitization as a bottom-up, emergent and iterative process of business model contestation.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Business Research. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Business Research, 104, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2018.10.037