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Shaping the city for walking and cycling : a case study of Lancaster.

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Shaping the city for walking and cycling : a case study of Lancaster. / Pooley, Colin; Horton, David; Scheldeman, Griet; Harrison, Richard.

In: Built Environment, Vol. 36, No. 4, 12.2010, p. 448-461.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Pooley, C, Horton, D, Scheldeman, G & Harrison, R 2010, 'Shaping the city for walking and cycling : a case study of Lancaster.', Built Environment, vol. 36, no. 4, pp. 448-461.

APA

Pooley, C., Horton, D., Scheldeman, G., & Harrison, R. (2010). Shaping the city for walking and cycling : a case study of Lancaster. Built Environment, 36(4), 448-461.

Vancouver

Pooley C, Horton D, Scheldeman G, Harrison R. Shaping the city for walking and cycling : a case study of Lancaster. Built Environment. 2010 Dec;36(4):448-461.

Author

Pooley, Colin ; Horton, David ; Scheldeman, Griet ; Harrison, Richard. / Shaping the city for walking and cycling : a case study of Lancaster. In: Built Environment. 2010 ; Vol. 36, No. 4. pp. 448-461.

Bibtex

@article{e77c5e52ddfa4d0f873d44a8efd074e1,
title = "Shaping the city for walking and cycling : a case study of Lancaster.",
abstract = "Walking is an almost ubiquitous means of travelling around the urban environment, yet it is rarely prioritised or promoted in urban planning. Cycling is undertaken by a small minority of the population but, in some urban areas at least, there has been substantial investment in infrastructure dedicated to cyclists. This paper uses the town of Lancaster (NW England) as a case study to examine critically the barriers to cycling and walking, the effectiveness of measures to promote cycling (Lancaster is a Cycle Demonstration Town) and the opportunities to improve the environment for both walking and cycling. It is argued that while investment in physical infrastructure is of value, the barriers to both cycling and walking go far beyond the physical environment and are deeply embedded in societal structures and the everyday practices of individuals and households. We argue for a more integrated approach to planning for sustainable travel in urban areas which recognises the limitations of focusing solely (or mainly) on the built environment. Evidence to support this thesis is drawn from a recent (ESRC/DfT funded) PhD thesis on facilitating walking in an urban environment and from on-going research on walking and cycling in Lancaster carried out as part of a larger EPSRC-funded project.",
keywords = "Walking, Cycling, Built Environment",
author = "Colin Pooley and David Horton and Griet Scheldeman and Richard Harrison",
year = "2010",
month = "12",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
pages = "448--461",
journal = "Built Environment",
issn = "0263-7960",
publisher = "Alexandrine Press",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Shaping the city for walking and cycling : a case study of Lancaster.

AU - Pooley, Colin

AU - Horton, David

AU - Scheldeman, Griet

AU - Harrison, Richard

PY - 2010/12

Y1 - 2010/12

N2 - Walking is an almost ubiquitous means of travelling around the urban environment, yet it is rarely prioritised or promoted in urban planning. Cycling is undertaken by a small minority of the population but, in some urban areas at least, there has been substantial investment in infrastructure dedicated to cyclists. This paper uses the town of Lancaster (NW England) as a case study to examine critically the barriers to cycling and walking, the effectiveness of measures to promote cycling (Lancaster is a Cycle Demonstration Town) and the opportunities to improve the environment for both walking and cycling. It is argued that while investment in physical infrastructure is of value, the barriers to both cycling and walking go far beyond the physical environment and are deeply embedded in societal structures and the everyday practices of individuals and households. We argue for a more integrated approach to planning for sustainable travel in urban areas which recognises the limitations of focusing solely (or mainly) on the built environment. Evidence to support this thesis is drawn from a recent (ESRC/DfT funded) PhD thesis on facilitating walking in an urban environment and from on-going research on walking and cycling in Lancaster carried out as part of a larger EPSRC-funded project.

AB - Walking is an almost ubiquitous means of travelling around the urban environment, yet it is rarely prioritised or promoted in urban planning. Cycling is undertaken by a small minority of the population but, in some urban areas at least, there has been substantial investment in infrastructure dedicated to cyclists. This paper uses the town of Lancaster (NW England) as a case study to examine critically the barriers to cycling and walking, the effectiveness of measures to promote cycling (Lancaster is a Cycle Demonstration Town) and the opportunities to improve the environment for both walking and cycling. It is argued that while investment in physical infrastructure is of value, the barriers to both cycling and walking go far beyond the physical environment and are deeply embedded in societal structures and the everyday practices of individuals and households. We argue for a more integrated approach to planning for sustainable travel in urban areas which recognises the limitations of focusing solely (or mainly) on the built environment. Evidence to support this thesis is drawn from a recent (ESRC/DfT funded) PhD thesis on facilitating walking in an urban environment and from on-going research on walking and cycling in Lancaster carried out as part of a larger EPSRC-funded project.

KW - Walking

KW - Cycling

KW - Built Environment

M3 - Journal article

VL - 36

SP - 448

EP - 461

JO - Built Environment

JF - Built Environment

SN - 0263-7960

IS - 4

ER -