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  • SleepGuard

    Rights statement: © ACM, 2018. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of ACM for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Proceedings of the ACM on Interactive, Mobile, Wearable and Ubiquitous Technologies, Volume 2 Issue 3, September 2018 http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/3264908

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SleepGuard: capturing rich sleep information using smartwatch sensing data

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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Article number98
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>09/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>Proceedings of the ACM on Interactive, Mobile, Wearable and Ubiquitous Technologies
Issue number3
Volume2
Number of pages34
Publication statusPublished
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Sleep is an important part of our daily routine – we spend about one-third of our time doing it. By tracking sleep-related events and activities, sleep monitoring provides decision support to help us understand sleep quality and causes of poor sleep. Wearable devices provide a new way for sleep monitoring, allowing us to monitor sleep from the comfort of our own home. However, existing solutions do not take full advantage of the rich sensor data provided by these devices. In this paper, we present the design and development of SleepGuard, a novel approach to track a wide range of sleep-related events using smartwatches. We show that using merely a single smartwatch,
it is possible to capture a rich amount of information about sleep events and sleeping context, including body posture and movements, acoustic events, and illumination conditions. We demonstrate that through these events it is possible to estimate sleep quality and identify factors affecting it most. We evaluate our approach by conducting extensive experiments involved fifteen users across a 2-week period. Our experimental results show that our approach can track a richer set of sleep events, provide better decision support for evaluating sleep quality, and help to identify causes for sleep problems compared to prior work.

Bibliographic note

© ACM, 2018. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of ACM for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Proceedings of the ACM on Interactive, Mobile, Wearable and Ubiquitous Technologies, Volume 2 Issue 3, September 2018 http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/3264908