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Sleepwalking through an epidemic: why social work should wake up to the threat of Hepatitis C

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Sleepwalking through an epidemic : why social work should wake up to the threat of Hepatitis C. / Paylor, Ian; Orgel, Michael.

In: British Journal of Social Work, Vol. 36, No. 6, 2004, p. 897-906.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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Paylor, Ian ; Orgel, Michael. / Sleepwalking through an epidemic : why social work should wake up to the threat of Hepatitis C. In: British Journal of Social Work. 2004 ; Vol. 36, No. 6. pp. 897-906.

Bibtex

@article{868dd24a876147a0a5679a1d9b666c7e,
title = "Sleepwalking through an epidemic: why social work should wake up to the threat of Hepatitis C",
abstract = "One of the many consequences of injecting drug use is the potential risk to infectious blood-borne viruses. There is evidence that the risk of contracting Hepatitis C (HCV) is greater than that of HIV. Despite repeated warnings from a variety of sources and thousands of new infections among drug users each year and rising incidents of {\textquoteleft}'crack{\textquoteright} injecting, successive governments have failed to address a public health emergency of immense proportions - the HCV epidemic. This article explores this issue and the implications it has for social work.",
keywords = "HCV , drug users , injecting , epidemic",
author = "Ian Paylor and Michael Orgel",
year = "2004",
doi = "10.1093/bjsw/bch107",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
pages = "897--906",
journal = "British Journal of Social Work",
issn = "0045-3102",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sleepwalking through an epidemic

T2 - why social work should wake up to the threat of Hepatitis C

AU - Paylor, Ian

AU - Orgel, Michael

PY - 2004

Y1 - 2004

N2 - One of the many consequences of injecting drug use is the potential risk to infectious blood-borne viruses. There is evidence that the risk of contracting Hepatitis C (HCV) is greater than that of HIV. Despite repeated warnings from a variety of sources and thousands of new infections among drug users each year and rising incidents of ‘'crack’ injecting, successive governments have failed to address a public health emergency of immense proportions - the HCV epidemic. This article explores this issue and the implications it has for social work.

AB - One of the many consequences of injecting drug use is the potential risk to infectious blood-borne viruses. There is evidence that the risk of contracting Hepatitis C (HCV) is greater than that of HIV. Despite repeated warnings from a variety of sources and thousands of new infections among drug users each year and rising incidents of ‘'crack’ injecting, successive governments have failed to address a public health emergency of immense proportions - the HCV epidemic. This article explores this issue and the implications it has for social work.

KW - HCV

KW - drug users

KW - injecting

KW - epidemic

U2 - 10.1093/bjsw/bch107

DO - 10.1093/bjsw/bch107

M3 - Journal article

VL - 36

SP - 897

EP - 906

JO - British Journal of Social Work

JF - British Journal of Social Work

SN - 0045-3102

IS - 6

ER -