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    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Neuropsychological Rehabilitation on 17/05/2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09602011.2016.1175359

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Social anxiety following traumatic brain injury: an exploration of associated factors

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>04/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>Neuropsychological Rehabilitation
Issue number4
Volume28
Number of pages21
Pages (from-to)527-547
Publication statusPublished
Early online date17/05/16
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Social anxiety (SA) following traumatic brain injury (TBI) has the potential to affect an individual’s general psychological well-being and social functioning, however little research has explored factors associated with its development. The present study used hierarchical multiple regression to investigate the demographic, clinical and psychological factors associated with SA following TBI. A sample of 85 people who experienced TBI were recruited through social media websites and brain injury services across the North-West of England. The overall combined biopsychosocial model was significant, explaining 52–54.3% of the variance in SA (across five imputations of missing data). The addition of psychological variables (self-esteem, locus of control, self-efficacy) made a significant contribution to the overall model, accounting for an additional 12.2–13% of variance in SA above that explained by demographic and clinical variables. Perceived stigma was the only significant independent predictor of SA (B = .274, p = .005). The findings suggest that psychological variables are important in the development of SA following TBI and must be considered alongside clinical factors. Furthermore, the significant role of stigma highlights the need for intervention at both an individualised and societal level.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Neuropsychological Rehabilitation on 17/05/2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09602011.2016.1175359