Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Social cognition in children with epilepsy in m...

Electronic data

  • lew2015

    Rights statement: © 2014 The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Mac Keith Press This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

    Final published version, 240 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Social cognition in children with epilepsy in mainstream education

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
Close
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>01/2015
<mark>Journal</mark>Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Issue number1
Volume57
Number of pages7
Pages (from-to)53-59
Publication statusPublished
Early online date21/10/14
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

AIM To establish whether deficits in social cognition are present in children with generalised or focal epilepsy in mainstream education, and whether any relation exists between social cognition, communication, and behaviour measures.
METHOD In a cross-sectional study, children with an epilepsy-only diagnoses in mainstream education (n=20 with generalized epilepsy; eight males, 12 females; mean age 11y 6mo, SD 2y 6mo; and n=27 with focal epilepsy; 12 males, 15 females; mean age 11y 8mo, SD 2y 2mo) and comparison participants (n=57; 28 males, 29 females; mean age 11y 2mo, SD 2y 4mo) were administered the Strange Stories task and the Mind in the Eyes task, as well as an IQ assessment. Parents completed the Children’s Communication Checklist-2 and the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL).
RESULTS Both groups of children with epilepsy performed more poorly than control children on the Mental Stories component of the Strange Stories task, F(2,101)=3.2, p<0.001. Performance on Mental Stories was related to pragmatic communication, but only in the generalized epilepsy group (r=0.51, p=0.03, 95% CI=0.2–0.8). There were no differences between epilepsy groups or control participants in the Mind in the Eyes task, F(2,101)=0.4, p=0.4.
INTERPRETATION Children with ‘epilepsy only’ are at risk of deficits in social cognition and may require appropriate support.

Bibliographic note

© 2014 The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Mac Keith Press This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.