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Social mixing patterns in rural and urban areas of southern China

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Social mixing patterns in rural and urban areas of southern China. / Read, Jonathan M.; Lessler, Justin; Riley, Steven; Wang, Shuying; Tan, Li Jiu; Kwok, Kin On; Guan, Yi; Jiang, Chao Qiang; Cummings, Derek A. T.

In: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 281, No. 1785, 20140268, 22.06.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Read, JM, Lessler, J, Riley, S, Wang, S, Tan, LJ, Kwok, KO, Guan, Y, Jiang, CQ & Cummings, DAT 2014, 'Social mixing patterns in rural and urban areas of southern China', Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, vol. 281, no. 1785, 20140268. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2014.0268

APA

Read, J. M., Lessler, J., Riley, S., Wang, S., Tan, L. J., Kwok, K. O., Guan, Y., Jiang, C. Q., & Cummings, D. A. T. (2014). Social mixing patterns in rural and urban areas of southern China. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 281(1785), [20140268]. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2014.0268

Vancouver

Read JM, Lessler J, Riley S, Wang S, Tan LJ, Kwok KO et al. Social mixing patterns in rural and urban areas of southern China. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 2014 Jun 22;281(1785). 20140268. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2014.0268

Author

Read, Jonathan M. ; Lessler, Justin ; Riley, Steven ; Wang, Shuying ; Tan, Li Jiu ; Kwok, Kin On ; Guan, Yi ; Jiang, Chao Qiang ; Cummings, Derek A. T. / Social mixing patterns in rural and urban areas of southern China. In: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 2014 ; Vol. 281, No. 1785.

Bibtex

@article{8db7107c19ea47d18bec637d5072a42f,
title = "Social mixing patterns in rural and urban areas of southern China",
abstract = "A dense population, global connectivity and frequent human-animal interaction give southern China an important role in the spread and emergence of infectious disease. However, patterns of person-to-person contact relevant to the spread of directly transmitted infections such as influenza remain poorly quantified in the region. We conducted a household-based survey of travel and contact patterns among urban and rural populations of Guangdong, China. We measured the character and distance from home of social encounters made by 1821 individuals. Most individuals reported 5-10 h of contact with around 10 individuals each day; however, both distributions have long tails. The distribution of distance from home at which contacts were made is similar: most were within a kilometre of the participant's home, while some occurred further than 500 km away. Compared with younger individuals, older individuals made fewer contacts which tended to be closer to home. There was strong assortativity in age-based contact rates. We found no difference between the total number or duration of contacts between urban and rural participants, but urban participants tended to make contacts closer to home. These results can improve mathematical models of infectious disease emergence, spread and control in southern China and throughout the region.",
keywords = "influenza, mathematical modelling, social mixing, contact diary, travel, infectious disease transmission, INFLUENZA-A, CONTACTS, TRANSMISSION, INFECTIONS, SPREAD, PARAMETERS, EPIDEMICS, NETWORKS, EXPOSURE, ONTARIO",
author = "Read, {Jonathan M.} and Justin Lessler and Steven Riley and Shuying Wang and Tan, {Li Jiu} and Kwok, {Kin On} and Yi Guan and Jiang, {Chao Qiang} and Cummings, {Derek A. T.}",
year = "2014",
month = jun
day = "22",
doi = "10.1098/rspb.2014.0268",
language = "English",
volume = "281",
journal = "Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences",
issn = "0962-8452",
publisher = "Royal Society of Chemistry Publishing",
number = "1785",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Social mixing patterns in rural and urban areas of southern China

AU - Read, Jonathan M.

AU - Lessler, Justin

AU - Riley, Steven

AU - Wang, Shuying

AU - Tan, Li Jiu

AU - Kwok, Kin On

AU - Guan, Yi

AU - Jiang, Chao Qiang

AU - Cummings, Derek A. T.

PY - 2014/6/22

Y1 - 2014/6/22

N2 - A dense population, global connectivity and frequent human-animal interaction give southern China an important role in the spread and emergence of infectious disease. However, patterns of person-to-person contact relevant to the spread of directly transmitted infections such as influenza remain poorly quantified in the region. We conducted a household-based survey of travel and contact patterns among urban and rural populations of Guangdong, China. We measured the character and distance from home of social encounters made by 1821 individuals. Most individuals reported 5-10 h of contact with around 10 individuals each day; however, both distributions have long tails. The distribution of distance from home at which contacts were made is similar: most were within a kilometre of the participant's home, while some occurred further than 500 km away. Compared with younger individuals, older individuals made fewer contacts which tended to be closer to home. There was strong assortativity in age-based contact rates. We found no difference between the total number or duration of contacts between urban and rural participants, but urban participants tended to make contacts closer to home. These results can improve mathematical models of infectious disease emergence, spread and control in southern China and throughout the region.

AB - A dense population, global connectivity and frequent human-animal interaction give southern China an important role in the spread and emergence of infectious disease. However, patterns of person-to-person contact relevant to the spread of directly transmitted infections such as influenza remain poorly quantified in the region. We conducted a household-based survey of travel and contact patterns among urban and rural populations of Guangdong, China. We measured the character and distance from home of social encounters made by 1821 individuals. Most individuals reported 5-10 h of contact with around 10 individuals each day; however, both distributions have long tails. The distribution of distance from home at which contacts were made is similar: most were within a kilometre of the participant's home, while some occurred further than 500 km away. Compared with younger individuals, older individuals made fewer contacts which tended to be closer to home. There was strong assortativity in age-based contact rates. We found no difference between the total number or duration of contacts between urban and rural participants, but urban participants tended to make contacts closer to home. These results can improve mathematical models of infectious disease emergence, spread and control in southern China and throughout the region.

KW - influenza

KW - mathematical modelling

KW - social mixing

KW - contact diary

KW - travel

KW - infectious disease transmission

KW - INFLUENZA-A

KW - CONTACTS

KW - TRANSMISSION

KW - INFECTIONS

KW - SPREAD

KW - PARAMETERS

KW - EPIDEMICS

KW - NETWORKS

KW - EXPOSURE

KW - ONTARIO

U2 - 10.1098/rspb.2014.0268

DO - 10.1098/rspb.2014.0268

M3 - Journal article

VL - 281

JO - Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

JF - Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

SN - 0962-8452

IS - 1785

M1 - 20140268

ER -