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  • Strategy Narratives and Wellbeing Challenges: The Role of Everyday Self-Presentation

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Business Research. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Business Research, 69, 1, 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2015.07.036

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    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

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Strategy narratives and wellbeing challenges: the role of everyday self-presentation

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>01/2016
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Business Research
Issue number1
Volume69
Number of pages10
Pages (from-to)234-243
Publication statusPublished
Early online date3/08/15
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

How do consumers manage their everyday self-presentation to attain a sense of wellbeing? Through the lens of consumption, this study contributes to understanding the link between self and everyday interactions by identifying and developing a typology of wellbeing challenges and how these are managed in a variety of social contexts. Fifteen phenomenological interviews revealed a series of strategy narratives through which individuals pursue wellbeing within their web of social encounters. These strategy narratives combine in a series of pathways that range from harmonious (e.g., enhancement) to incongruous (e.g., concealment) in individuals' efforts to manage challenges to personal wellbeing. Constructing a typology from these pathways, the research findings pose both opportunities and challenges for social marketers to promote consumers' positive experiences in the marketplace.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Business Research. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Business Research, 69, 1, 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2015.07.036