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  • UMHC Assessment Paper - preprint

    Submitted manuscript, 310 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 24/12/21

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

  • UMHC_Assessment_Paper_ReSubmission_2020_06_01

    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education on 24/06/2020, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02602938.2020.1782344

    Accepted author manuscript, 262 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 24/12/21

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Student wellbeing and assessment in higher education: The balancing act

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

E-pub ahead of print
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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>24/06/2020
<mark>Journal</mark>Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education
Publication StatusE-pub ahead of print
Early online date24/06/20
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

This paper draws on staff and student consultations conducted during the development of Student Minds’ University Mental Health Charter to identify five key tensions which can arise in assessment design and strategy when seeking to balance the wellbeing of students with pedagogical, practical and policy considerations. It highlights the need to acknowledge the pressures of assessment on staff wellbeing as well as students. The particular tensions explored include the need to balance challenge against the psychological threats this can entail; the varying impacts of traditional and novel forms of assessment; the differing demands of collaborative and individual work; the tensions between ideal strategies and those which are practically feasible; and the ways in which feedback is given (as a constructive learning tool) and received (often as a psychological threat). These tensions can provide a valuable point of reflection for educators who need to critically and proactively navigate these conflicts within their own assessment design and practices, as part of a wider whole university approach to promoting student wellbeing.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education on 24/06/2020, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02602938.2020.1782344