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Studying Vision-Based Multiple-User Interaction with In-home Large Displays

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Publication date2008
Host publicationProceeding of the 3rd ACM international workshop on Human-centered computing - HCC '08
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherACM
Pages19-26
Number of pages8
ISBN (Print)978-1-60558-320-4
<mark>Original language</mark>English
Event3rd ACM Workshop on Human-Centered Computing, HCC 2008 - Vancouver, Canada

Conference

Conference3rd ACM Workshop on Human-Centered Computing, HCC 2008
CountryCanada
CityVancouver
Period31/10/0831/10/08

Conference

Conference3rd ACM Workshop on Human-Centered Computing, HCC 2008
CountryCanada
CityVancouver
Period31/10/0831/10/08

Abstract

Large displays at home such as TVs are becoming larger in size and more interactive in functionality. When multiple co-located users share the screen space of a large display, when, where and how to display their media contents becomes an issue. This paper compares the use of automatic versus manual methods for managing personal screen real-estate on large in-home displays. We assume horizontally laid out "personal interaction spaces" as the user interface for multiple users to manage their screen real-estate. In this case, users need to sign in and out as well as have their personal spaces placed on the display. We constructed a computer-vision based system that tracks the identities and positions of multiple people in front of the display to support the user studies that compare the use of tracker-based mechanisms versus manual ones for managing the display. Our results suggest that the tracking system shows promise for a) simplifying the user registration process in conjunction with a manual sign-in/out process and b) effective tracker-based user-centric placement of people's interaction space. Proper integration of manual methods could improve the sense of control and ownership for users.