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Supporting Law Enforcement in Digital Communities through Natural Language Analysis

Research output: Contribution in Book/Report/ProceedingsPaper

Published

Publication date2008
Host publicationComputational Forensics : Second International Workshop, IWCF 2008, Washington, DC, USA, August 7-8, 2008. Proceedings
EditorsSargur N. Srihari, Katrin Franke
Place of publicationBerlin
PublisherSpringer
Pages122-134
Number of pages13
ISBN (Print)978-3-540-85302-2
Original languageEnglish

Conference

Conference2nd International Workshop on Computational Forensics (IWCF 2008)
CityWashington DC, USA
Period7/08/088/08/08

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science
PublisherSpringer
Volume5158
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Conference

Conference2nd International Workshop on Computational Forensics (IWCF 2008)
CityWashington DC, USA
Period7/08/088/08/08

Abstract

Recent years have seen an explosion in the number and scale of digital communities (e.g. peer-to-peer file sharing systems, chat applications and social networking sites). Unfortunately, digital communities are host to significant criminal activity including copyright infringement, identity theft and child sexual abuse. Combating this growing level of crime is problematic due to the ever increasing scale of today’s digital communities. This paper presents an approach to provide automated support for the detection of child sexual abuse related activities in digital communities. Specifically, we analyze the characteristics of child sexual abuse media distribution in P2P file sharing networks and carry out an exploratory study to show that corpus-based natural language analysis may be used to automate the detection of this activity. We then give an overview of how this approach can be extended to police chat and social networking communities.