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  • Supporter qualitative analysis paper final accepted version JARID

    Rights statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Scott K, Hatton C, Knight R, et al. Supporting people with intellectual disabilities in psychological therapies for depression: A qualitative analysis of supporters’ experiences. J Appl Res Intellect Disabil. 2019;32:323–335. https://doi.org/10.1111/jar.12529 which has been published in final form athttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jar.12529 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

    Accepted author manuscript, 395 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Supporting people with intellectual disabilities in psychological therapies for depression: A qualitative analysis of supporters' experiences

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
  • Katie Scott
  • Chris Hatton
  • Rosie Knight
  • Kevanne Singer
  • Dawn Knowles
  • Dave Dagnan
  • Richard P Hastings
  • Kim Appleton
  • Sally-Ann Cooper
  • Craig Melville
  • Rob Jones
  • Chris Williams
  • Andrew Jahoda
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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>28/03/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities
Issue number2
Volume32
Number of pages13
Pages (from-to)323-335
Publication statusPublished
Early online date28/09/18
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Clinicians recommend including carers or others in a supporting role in the therapy as an important adaptation of psychological therapies for people with intellectual disabilities. This nested qualitative study from a larger trial explored supporters' experiences of supporting people with intellectual disabilities receiving behavioural activation or guided self-help therapies for depression.

METHOD: Twenty-one purposively sampled supporters were interviewed. The semi-structured interviews were subject to framework analysis, covering expectations of therapy, views of therapy sessions, relationships with therapist and participant, and perceived changes.

RESULTS: Supporters were positive about both therapies and reported both therapy-specific and nonspecific therapeutic factors that had significant positive impacts on people's lives. Most supporters reported their involvement contributed to the interventions' effectiveness, and helped establish closer relationships to the people they were supporting.

CONCLUSIONS: The presence of supporters within psychological therapies for people with intellectual disabilities can be an effective adaptation to therapies for this population.

Bibliographic note

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Scott K, Hatton C, Knight R, et al. Supporting people with intellectual disabilities in psychological therapies for depression: A qualitative analysis of supporters’ experiences. J Appl Res Intellect Disabil. 2019;32:323–335. https://doi.org/10.1111/jar.12529 which has been published in final form athttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jar.12529 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.