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Synthesis and characterisation of enhanced barrier polyurethane for encapsulation of implantable medical devices

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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Synthesis and characterisation of enhanced barrier polyurethane for encapsulation of implantable medical devices. / Roohpour, N.; Wasikiewicz, J.M.; Paul, D.; Vadgama, P.; Rehman, I.U.

In: Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine, Vol. 20, No. 9, 2009, p. 1803-1814.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Roohpour, N, Wasikiewicz, JM, Paul, D, Vadgama, P & Rehman, IU 2009, 'Synthesis and characterisation of enhanced barrier polyurethane for encapsulation of implantable medical devices', Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine, vol. 20, no. 9, pp. 1803-1814. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10856-009-3754-9

APA

Roohpour, N., Wasikiewicz, J. M., Paul, D., Vadgama, P., & Rehman, I. U. (2009). Synthesis and characterisation of enhanced barrier polyurethane for encapsulation of implantable medical devices. Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine, 20(9), 1803-1814. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10856-009-3754-9

Vancouver

Roohpour N, Wasikiewicz JM, Paul D, Vadgama P, Rehman IU. Synthesis and characterisation of enhanced barrier polyurethane for encapsulation of implantable medical devices. Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine. 2009;20(9):1803-1814. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10856-009-3754-9

Author

Roohpour, N. ; Wasikiewicz, J.M. ; Paul, D. ; Vadgama, P. ; Rehman, I.U. / Synthesis and characterisation of enhanced barrier polyurethane for encapsulation of implantable medical devices. In: Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine. 2009 ; Vol. 20, No. 9. pp. 1803-1814.

Bibtex

@article{7491e15d813d4867b6a1a84418db23c7,
title = "Synthesis and characterisation of enhanced barrier polyurethane for encapsulation of implantable medical devices",
abstract = "Polymeric membranes have been used as interfaces between implantable devices and biological tissues to operate as a protective barrier from water exchanging and to enhance biocompatibility. Polyurethanes have been used as biocompatible membranes for decades. In this study, copolymers of polyether urethane (PEU) with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) were synthesised with the goal of creating materials with low water permeability and high elasticity. PDMS was incorporated into polymer backbone as a part of the soft segment during polyurethane synthesis and physical properties as well as water permeability of resulting copolymer were studied in regard to PDMS content. Increase in PDMS content led to increase of microphase separation of the copolymer and corresponding increase in elastic modulus. Surface energy of the polymer was decreased by incorporating PDMS compared to unmodified PEU. PDMS in copolymer formed a hydrophobic surface which caused reduction in water permeability and water uptake of the membranes. Thus, PDMS containing polyurethane with its potent water resistant properties demonstrated a great promise for use as an implantable encapsulation material. {\textcopyright} 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.",
keywords = "As interfaces, Bio-compatible membranes, Biological tissues, Characterisation, Hydrophobic surfaces, Implantable devices, Implantable medical devices, Low water, Polydimethylsiloxane PDMS, Polyether urethanes, Polymer backbones, Polyurethane synthesis, Protective barrier, Soft segments, Surface energies, Water permeability, Water uptake, Water-resistant property, Biocompatibility, Biological membranes, Capillarity, Copolymerization, Hydrophobicity, Microchannels, Microphase separation, Polymeric membranes, Polymers, Surface chemistry, Surface tension, Water content, Silicones, copolymer, dimeticone, polyetherurethan, article, biocompatibility, device, elasticity, encapsulation, energy, hydrophobicity, implant, membrane permeability, priority journal, synthesis, tensile strength, thermal analysis, water permeability, water transport, Calorimetry, Differential Scanning, Dimethylpolysiloxanes, Elasticity, Light, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Materials Testing, Polyurethanes, Prostheses and Implants, Scattering, Radiation, Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared, Spectrum Analysis, Raman, Stress, Mechanical, Tensile Strength, Water",
author = "N. Roohpour and J.M. Wasikiewicz and D. Paul and P. Vadgama and I.U. Rehman",
year = "2009",
doi = "10.1007/s10856-009-3754-9",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "1803--1814",
journal = "Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine",
issn = "0957-4530",
publisher = "Kluwer Academic Publishers",
number = "9",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Synthesis and characterisation of enhanced barrier polyurethane for encapsulation of implantable medical devices

AU - Roohpour, N.

AU - Wasikiewicz, J.M.

AU - Paul, D.

AU - Vadgama, P.

AU - Rehman, I.U.

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - Polymeric membranes have been used as interfaces between implantable devices and biological tissues to operate as a protective barrier from water exchanging and to enhance biocompatibility. Polyurethanes have been used as biocompatible membranes for decades. In this study, copolymers of polyether urethane (PEU) with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) were synthesised with the goal of creating materials with low water permeability and high elasticity. PDMS was incorporated into polymer backbone as a part of the soft segment during polyurethane synthesis and physical properties as well as water permeability of resulting copolymer were studied in regard to PDMS content. Increase in PDMS content led to increase of microphase separation of the copolymer and corresponding increase in elastic modulus. Surface energy of the polymer was decreased by incorporating PDMS compared to unmodified PEU. PDMS in copolymer formed a hydrophobic surface which caused reduction in water permeability and water uptake of the membranes. Thus, PDMS containing polyurethane with its potent water resistant properties demonstrated a great promise for use as an implantable encapsulation material. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

AB - Polymeric membranes have been used as interfaces between implantable devices and biological tissues to operate as a protective barrier from water exchanging and to enhance biocompatibility. Polyurethanes have been used as biocompatible membranes for decades. In this study, copolymers of polyether urethane (PEU) with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) were synthesised with the goal of creating materials with low water permeability and high elasticity. PDMS was incorporated into polymer backbone as a part of the soft segment during polyurethane synthesis and physical properties as well as water permeability of resulting copolymer were studied in regard to PDMS content. Increase in PDMS content led to increase of microphase separation of the copolymer and corresponding increase in elastic modulus. Surface energy of the polymer was decreased by incorporating PDMS compared to unmodified PEU. PDMS in copolymer formed a hydrophobic surface which caused reduction in water permeability and water uptake of the membranes. Thus, PDMS containing polyurethane with its potent water resistant properties demonstrated a great promise for use as an implantable encapsulation material. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

KW - As interfaces

KW - Bio-compatible membranes

KW - Biological tissues

KW - Characterisation

KW - Hydrophobic surfaces

KW - Implantable devices

KW - Implantable medical devices

KW - Low water

KW - Polydimethylsiloxane PDMS

KW - Polyether urethanes

KW - Polymer backbones

KW - Polyurethane synthesis

KW - Protective barrier

KW - Soft segments

KW - Surface energies

KW - Water permeability

KW - Water uptake

KW - Water-resistant property

KW - Biocompatibility

KW - Biological membranes

KW - Capillarity

KW - Copolymerization

KW - Hydrophobicity

KW - Microchannels

KW - Microphase separation

KW - Polymeric membranes

KW - Polymers

KW - Surface chemistry

KW - Surface tension

KW - Water content

KW - Silicones

KW - copolymer

KW - dimeticone

KW - polyetherurethan

KW - article

KW - biocompatibility

KW - device

KW - elasticity

KW - encapsulation

KW - energy

KW - hydrophobicity

KW - implant

KW - membrane permeability

KW - priority journal

KW - synthesis

KW - tensile strength

KW - thermal analysis

KW - water permeability

KW - water transport

KW - Calorimetry, Differential Scanning

KW - Dimethylpolysiloxanes

KW - Elasticity

KW - Light

KW - Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

KW - Materials Testing

KW - Polyurethanes

KW - Prostheses and Implants

KW - Scattering, Radiation

KW - Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared

KW - Spectrum Analysis, Raman

KW - Stress, Mechanical

KW - Tensile Strength

KW - Water

U2 - 10.1007/s10856-009-3754-9

DO - 10.1007/s10856-009-3754-9

M3 - Journal article

VL - 20

SP - 1803

EP - 1814

JO - Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine

JF - Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine

SN - 0957-4530

IS - 9

ER -