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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Power Sources. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Power Sources, 329, 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.jpowsour.2016.08.120

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Temperature dependency of state of charge inhomogeneities and their equalization in cylindrical lithium-ion cells

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
  • P. J. Osswald
  • S. V. Erhard
  • A. Rheinfeld
  • B. Rieger
  • Harry Hoster
  • A. Jossen
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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>15/10/2016
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Power Sources
Volume329
Number of pages7
Pages (from-to)546-552
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date4/09/16
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

The influence of cell temperature on the current density distribution and accompanying inhomogeneities in state of charge (SOC) during cycling is analyzed in this work. To allow for a detailed insight in the electrochemical behavior of the cell, commercially available 26650 cells were modified to allow for measuring local potentials at four different, nearly equidistant positions along the electrodes. As a follow-up to our previous work investigating local potentials within a cell, we apply this method for studying SOC deviations and their sensitivity to cell temperature. The local potential distribution was studied during constant current discharge operations for various current rates and discharge pulses in order to evoke local inhomogeneities for temperatures ranging from 10 °C to 40 °C. Differences in local potentials were considered for estimating local SOC variations within the electrodes. It could be observed that even low currents such as 0.1C can lead to significant inhomogeneities, whereas a higher cell temperature generally results in more pronounced inhomogeneities. A rapid SOC equilibration can be observed if the variation in the SOC distribution corresponds to a considerable potential difference defined by the open circuit voltage of either the positive or negative electrode. With increasing temperature, accelerated equalization effects can be observed.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Power Sources. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Power Sources, 329, 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.jpowsour.2016.08.120