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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in European Journal of Operational Research. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in European Journal of Operational Research, 276, 1, 2019 DOI: 10.1016/j.ejor.2018.12.039

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    Embargo ends: 2/01/21

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The co-evolution of competition and parasitism in the resource-based view: a risk model of product counterfeiting

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/07/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>European Journal of Operational Research
Issue number1
Volume276
Number of pages14
Pages (from-to)300-313
Publication statusPublished
Early online date2/01/19
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

The primary concern in the resource-based view of the firm has been competition. For many firms, however, the relevant ecology includes parasites as well as competitors – notably product counterfeiters who parasitically exploit a firm’s reputational resource. This parasitic process both diminishes the reputational resource it exploits, and produces significant risk of harm as a by-product. This article extends the resource-based view, presenting an account of the mechanism by which competition and parasitism co-evolve and produce a distinctive form of resource erosion. It does so using a model which, because a firm’s reputational resource exists distributedly in the minds of mutually-influencing but not centrally-coordinated consumers, takes an agent-based approach. This model then naturally forms a basis for the probabilistic risk assessment of the consequences of parasitism – particularly the harm that arises from the counterfeiting of safety critical products such as pharmaceuticals. The intended contribution is to show how the resource-based view can be extended to reflect the fact that heterogeneous resource distribution is implicated in parasitism as much as competition, and to show how a model of the underlying mechanisms can support risk analysis.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in European Journal of Operational Research. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in European Journal of Operational Research, 276, 1, 2019 DOI: 10.1016/j.ejor.2018.12.039