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The developing juvenile ischium

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The developing juvenile ischium. / Maclean, Stephen J.; Black, Sue M.; Cunningham, Craig A.

In: Clinical Anatomy, Vol. 27, No. 6, 09.2014, p. 906-914.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Maclean, SJ, Black, SM & Cunningham, CA 2014, 'The developing juvenile ischium', Clinical Anatomy, vol. 27, no. 6, pp. 906-914. https://doi.org/10.1002/ca.22391

APA

Maclean, S. J., Black, S. M., & Cunningham, C. A. (2014). The developing juvenile ischium. Clinical Anatomy, 27(6), 906-914. https://doi.org/10.1002/ca.22391

Vancouver

Maclean SJ, Black SM, Cunningham CA. The developing juvenile ischium. Clinical Anatomy. 2014 Sep;27(6):906-914. https://doi.org/10.1002/ca.22391

Author

Maclean, Stephen J. ; Black, Sue M. ; Cunningham, Craig A. / The developing juvenile ischium. In: Clinical Anatomy. 2014 ; Vol. 27, No. 6. pp. 906-914.

Bibtex

@article{33c111527eff436d89474ab609a69172,
title = "The developing juvenile ischium",
abstract = "Despite the importance of the human pelvis as a weight-bearing structure, there is a paucity of literature that discusses the development of the juvenile innominate from a biomechanical perspective. This study aims to add to the limited body of literature pertaining to this topic through the qualitative analysis of the gross architecture of the human ischium during the juvenile period. Macro-radiographs of 55 human ischia ranging from 28 intra-uterine weeks to 14 years of age were examined using intensity-gradient color mapping to highlight changes in gross structural morphology with increasing age. A clear pattern of maturation was observed in the juvenile ischium with increasing age. The acetabular component and ramus of the ischium consistently displayed low bone intensity in the postnatal skeletal material. Conversely the posterior body of the ischium, and in particular the ischial spine and lesser sciatic notch, exhibited increasing bone intensity which first arose at 1-2 years of age and became more expansive in older cohorts. The intensity patterns observed within the developing juvenile ischium are indicative of the potential factors influencing the maturation of this skeletal element. While the low intensity acetabular fossa indicates a lack of significant biomechanical interactions, the posterior increase in bone intensity may be related to the load-bearing nature of the posterior ischium.",
keywords = "ischium, Juvenile, macro-radiography, Growth, Biomechanics",
author = "Maclean, {Stephen J.} and Black, {Sue M.} and Cunningham, {Craig A.}",
year = "2014",
month = sep,
doi = "10.1002/ca.22391",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "906--914",
journal = "Clinical Anatomy",
issn = "0897-3806",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The developing juvenile ischium

AU - Maclean, Stephen J.

AU - Black, Sue M.

AU - Cunningham, Craig A.

PY - 2014/9

Y1 - 2014/9

N2 - Despite the importance of the human pelvis as a weight-bearing structure, there is a paucity of literature that discusses the development of the juvenile innominate from a biomechanical perspective. This study aims to add to the limited body of literature pertaining to this topic through the qualitative analysis of the gross architecture of the human ischium during the juvenile period. Macro-radiographs of 55 human ischia ranging from 28 intra-uterine weeks to 14 years of age were examined using intensity-gradient color mapping to highlight changes in gross structural morphology with increasing age. A clear pattern of maturation was observed in the juvenile ischium with increasing age. The acetabular component and ramus of the ischium consistently displayed low bone intensity in the postnatal skeletal material. Conversely the posterior body of the ischium, and in particular the ischial spine and lesser sciatic notch, exhibited increasing bone intensity which first arose at 1-2 years of age and became more expansive in older cohorts. The intensity patterns observed within the developing juvenile ischium are indicative of the potential factors influencing the maturation of this skeletal element. While the low intensity acetabular fossa indicates a lack of significant biomechanical interactions, the posterior increase in bone intensity may be related to the load-bearing nature of the posterior ischium.

AB - Despite the importance of the human pelvis as a weight-bearing structure, there is a paucity of literature that discusses the development of the juvenile innominate from a biomechanical perspective. This study aims to add to the limited body of literature pertaining to this topic through the qualitative analysis of the gross architecture of the human ischium during the juvenile period. Macro-radiographs of 55 human ischia ranging from 28 intra-uterine weeks to 14 years of age were examined using intensity-gradient color mapping to highlight changes in gross structural morphology with increasing age. A clear pattern of maturation was observed in the juvenile ischium with increasing age. The acetabular component and ramus of the ischium consistently displayed low bone intensity in the postnatal skeletal material. Conversely the posterior body of the ischium, and in particular the ischial spine and lesser sciatic notch, exhibited increasing bone intensity which first arose at 1-2 years of age and became more expansive in older cohorts. The intensity patterns observed within the developing juvenile ischium are indicative of the potential factors influencing the maturation of this skeletal element. While the low intensity acetabular fossa indicates a lack of significant biomechanical interactions, the posterior increase in bone intensity may be related to the load-bearing nature of the posterior ischium.

KW - ischium

KW - Juvenile

KW - macro-radiography

KW - Growth

KW - Biomechanics

U2 - 10.1002/ca.22391

DO - 10.1002/ca.22391

M3 - Journal article

VL - 27

SP - 906

EP - 914

JO - Clinical Anatomy

JF - Clinical Anatomy

SN - 0897-3806

IS - 6

ER -