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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Environmental Chemical Engineering. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Environmental Chemical Engineering, 7, 3, 2019 DOI: 10.1016/j.jece.2019.103138

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The effect of acidogenic and methanogenic conditions on the availability and stability of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in a digestate

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
Article number103138
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/06/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Environmental Chemical Engineering
Issue number3
Volume7
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished
Early online date6/05/19
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Acidification and drying of digestate are important post-treatment for, respectively, improving nutrient availability and hygiene. These approaches are expected to reduce digestate soil application mass and increase its value. This study compared eleven organic feedstocks under acidogenic and methanogenic conditions as a sustainable approach to improving phosphorus availablity, organic carbon and stabilising ammoniacal nitrogen of the resulting digestate under thermal drying. The result showed increases in phosphate concentration under acidogenic conditions and reduction in ammonium nitrogen after drying at 100 °C. The highest phosphate values of 3.2 ± 0.38 g/kg were achieved using whey permeate substrate while the effect of drying on ammonium nitrogen concentration was lowest for acidogenic bird seed fermentation with an ammonium loss of 59.7%. Both results were facilitated by high total volatile fatty acid concentration produced from available organic carbon which reached a maximum value of 5.71 ± 0.53 g/L, respectively. Increases in phosphate and ammonium nitrogen stability under acidogenic conditions was a consequence of lower pH, a condition synonymous with acidogenic only fermentation. The accumulated volatile fatty acid contributed to higher carbon to nitrogen ratio under acidogenic fermentation. Higher labile carbon to nitrogen ratio can trigger immobilization of ammonium nitrogen in the soil and this presents a case for subsequent experimentation into acidogenic digestate application in soil.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Environmental Chemical Engineering. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Environmental Chemical Engineering, 7, 3, 2019 DOI: 10.1016/j.jece.2019.103138