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    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Bird Study on 4 Sep 2020, available online:  https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00063657.2020.1808592

    Accepted author manuscript, 425 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 4/09/21

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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The effects of geolocators on return rates, condition, and breeding success in Common Sandpipers Actitis hypoleucos

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/10/2020
<mark>Journal</mark>Bird Study
Issue number2
Volume67
Number of pages7
Pages (from-to)217-223
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date4/09/20
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Capsule: Fitting geolocators to Common Sandpipers Actitis hypoleucos did not affect their return rates, return dates, body condition or reproductive success, but did cause leg injuries in some individuals.
Aims: To investigate the effect of fitting geolocators to Common Sandpipers on their return rates and timing, the condition in which they return and their subsequent breeding success.
Methods: We fitted geolocators to colour-ringed Common Sandpipers and monitored them throughout the breeding seasons prior to migration and following return from their wintering grounds. We then compared return rate, return date, change in body condition, hatching success, and fledging success between birds with and without the tags. We also fitted a number of smaller geolocators to wintering individuals in Africa and compared their return rates with a control group.
Results: We found no significant differences between birds with and without geolocators in any of the variables measured. However, several individuals fitted with the larger tags were found to have incurred leg injuries.
Conclusion: Our study highlights the need for complete transparency when reporting the effects of geolocators and shows the importance of continuous monitoring of individuals when carrying out tracking studies.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Bird Study on 4 Sep 2020, available online:  https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00063657.2020.1808592