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  • Parents experiences lit review - PURE version

    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Brain Injury on 27/07/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/101.1080/02699052.2017.1341999

    Accepted author manuscript, 631 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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The experiences of parenting a child with an acquired brain injury: a metasynthesis of the qualitative literature

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>12/2017
<mark>Journal</mark>Brain Injury
Issue number12
Volume31
Number of pages11
Pages (from-to)1553-1563
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date27/07/17
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Objective. To systematically review and then synthesize the qualitative literature on the experience of parenting a child with an acquired brain injury (ABI).

Design. Systematic literature review and meta-synthesis

Methods. A systematic search of the literature was conducted in four databases. Papers which met the inclusion criterion were assessed for quality using the Critical Skills Appraisal Programme (CASP) tool and then synthesized according to Noblit and Hare’s (1988) guidelines for meta-ethnography.

Results. Of the 4855 papers retrieved, 17 met the inclusion criteria. Synthesis resulted in three themes: (1) Disconnection: Cut off from internal emotions and isolated from others; (2) Seeking understanding and support to manage in an insecure world; and (3) New parent to a different child.

Conclusions. Having a child with an ABI leads to many challenges for parents. These include feeling insecure, isolated from others and struggling to adapt to the different roles required to parent their different child. Clinical implications highlight the need for specialist support that is ongoing after discharge, including specialist knowledge and understanding of ABI and opportunities for peer support.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Brain Injury on 27/07/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/101.1080/02699052.2017.1341999