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The influence of positive affect on jumping to conclusions in delusional thinking

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The influence of positive affect on jumping to conclusions in delusional thinking. / Lee, Gary; Barrowclough, Christine; Lobban, Fiona.

In: Personality and Individual Differences, Vol. 50, No. 5, 04.2011, p. 717-722.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Lee, G, Barrowclough, C & Lobban, F 2011, 'The influence of positive affect on jumping to conclusions in delusional thinking', Personality and Individual Differences, vol. 50, no. 5, pp. 717-722. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2010.12.024

APA

Lee, G., Barrowclough, C., & Lobban, F. (2011). The influence of positive affect on jumping to conclusions in delusional thinking. Personality and Individual Differences, 50(5), 717-722. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2010.12.024

Vancouver

Lee G, Barrowclough C, Lobban F. The influence of positive affect on jumping to conclusions in delusional thinking. Personality and Individual Differences. 2011 Apr;50(5):717-722. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2010.12.024

Author

Lee, Gary ; Barrowclough, Christine ; Lobban, Fiona. / The influence of positive affect on jumping to conclusions in delusional thinking. In: Personality and Individual Differences. 2011 ; Vol. 50, No. 5. pp. 717-722.

Bibtex

@article{c1f2aef8d1784bdea60f159c7468f774,
title = "The influence of positive affect on jumping to conclusions in delusional thinking",
abstract = "This study examined relationships between positive affect and jumping to conclusions (JTC) in delusional thinking. One hundred and eighty-nine non-clinical participants entered an internet experiment and were randomized into one of two conditions. Those in a positive condition performed online creativity tasks and received bogus positive feedback as part of a positive affect induction procedure, whilst a neutral condition received neutral feedback. Both groups were subsequently assessed on a survey task for changes in JTC. In line with hypotheses, participants in the positive condition requested significantly more survey comments before drawing conclusions than those in the neutral condition. Results suggest that increases in positive affect may be linked with a tendency to gather more information before making decisions (i.e. a reduction in JTC). The influence of positive affect on reasoning biases in social environments is discussed. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "Jumping to conclusions, Delusions, Positive affect, Psychosis, PRONE INDIVIDUALS, TO-CONCLUSIONS, PSYCHOSIS, INFORMATION, PSYCHOLOGY, EMOTIONS, IDEATION, IMPACT, BIASES, MOOD",
author = "Gary Lee and Christine Barrowclough and Fiona Lobban",
year = "2011",
month = apr,
doi = "10.1016/j.paid.2010.12.024",
language = "English",
volume = "50",
pages = "717--722",
journal = "Personality and Individual Differences",
issn = "0191-8869",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The influence of positive affect on jumping to conclusions in delusional thinking

AU - Lee, Gary

AU - Barrowclough, Christine

AU - Lobban, Fiona

PY - 2011/4

Y1 - 2011/4

N2 - This study examined relationships between positive affect and jumping to conclusions (JTC) in delusional thinking. One hundred and eighty-nine non-clinical participants entered an internet experiment and were randomized into one of two conditions. Those in a positive condition performed online creativity tasks and received bogus positive feedback as part of a positive affect induction procedure, whilst a neutral condition received neutral feedback. Both groups were subsequently assessed on a survey task for changes in JTC. In line with hypotheses, participants in the positive condition requested significantly more survey comments before drawing conclusions than those in the neutral condition. Results suggest that increases in positive affect may be linked with a tendency to gather more information before making decisions (i.e. a reduction in JTC). The influence of positive affect on reasoning biases in social environments is discussed. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

AB - This study examined relationships between positive affect and jumping to conclusions (JTC) in delusional thinking. One hundred and eighty-nine non-clinical participants entered an internet experiment and were randomized into one of two conditions. Those in a positive condition performed online creativity tasks and received bogus positive feedback as part of a positive affect induction procedure, whilst a neutral condition received neutral feedback. Both groups were subsequently assessed on a survey task for changes in JTC. In line with hypotheses, participants in the positive condition requested significantly more survey comments before drawing conclusions than those in the neutral condition. Results suggest that increases in positive affect may be linked with a tendency to gather more information before making decisions (i.e. a reduction in JTC). The influence of positive affect on reasoning biases in social environments is discussed. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KW - Jumping to conclusions

KW - Delusions

KW - Positive affect

KW - Psychosis

KW - PRONE INDIVIDUALS

KW - TO-CONCLUSIONS

KW - PSYCHOSIS

KW - INFORMATION

KW - PSYCHOLOGY

KW - EMOTIONS

KW - IDEATION

KW - IMPACT

KW - BIASES

KW - MOOD

U2 - 10.1016/j.paid.2010.12.024

DO - 10.1016/j.paid.2010.12.024

M3 - Journal article

VL - 50

SP - 717

EP - 722

JO - Personality and Individual Differences

JF - Personality and Individual Differences

SN - 0191-8869

IS - 5

ER -