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  • 2012-005

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The International Market for MBA Qualifications

Research output: Working paper

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The International Market for MBA Qualifications. / Elliott, Caroline; Soo, Kwok Tong.

Lancaster : The Department of Economics, 2012. p. 1-38 (Economics Working Paper Series).

Research output: Working paper

Harvard

Elliott, C & Soo, KT 2012 'The International Market for MBA Qualifications' Economics Working Paper Series, The Department of Economics, Lancaster, pp. 1-38.

APA

Elliott, C., & Soo, K. T. (2012). The International Market for MBA Qualifications. (pp. 1-38). (Economics Working Paper Series). Lancaster: The Department of Economics.

Vancouver

Elliott C, Soo KT. The International Market for MBA Qualifications. Lancaster: The Department of Economics. 2012 Dec, p. 1-38. (Economics Working Paper Series).

Author

Elliott, Caroline ; Soo, Kwok Tong. / The International Market for MBA Qualifications. Lancaster : The Department of Economics, 2012. pp. 1-38 (Economics Working Paper Series).

Bibtex

@techreport{12bddc4782ae405db688cf76d04559b6,
title = "The International Market for MBA Qualifications",
abstract = "This paper explores the relationship between fees charged by MBA programmes and the number of applications to these programmes, using a panel dataset comprising universities from countries across the world. Using Three-Stage-Least-Squares methods for simultaneous equations, we find a two-way relationship between fees and applications: higher application numbers encourage universities to charge higher fees in the future, but higher fees in turn curtail application numbers. Of particular note are the results pertaining to additional explanatory variables that potentially represent MBA programme quality signals to applicants. We find evidence that higher GMAT scores of existing students increase applications, as do higher post MBA salaries. Meanwhile, university and programme professional accreditations do not impact on student application choices, nor do alumni ratings of programme quality. Published MBA programme rankings appear to have little impact on applications, and where an effect can be identified, it appears that a better ranking discourages applications.",
author = "Caroline Elliott and Soo, {Kwok Tong}",
note = "2012-005",
year = "2012",
month = "12",
language = "English",
series = "Economics Working Paper Series",
publisher = "The Department of Economics",
pages = "1--38",
type = "WorkingPaper",
institution = "The Department of Economics",

}

RIS

TY - UNPB

T1 - The International Market for MBA Qualifications

AU - Elliott, Caroline

AU - Soo, Kwok Tong

N1 - 2012-005

PY - 2012/12

Y1 - 2012/12

N2 - This paper explores the relationship between fees charged by MBA programmes and the number of applications to these programmes, using a panel dataset comprising universities from countries across the world. Using Three-Stage-Least-Squares methods for simultaneous equations, we find a two-way relationship between fees and applications: higher application numbers encourage universities to charge higher fees in the future, but higher fees in turn curtail application numbers. Of particular note are the results pertaining to additional explanatory variables that potentially represent MBA programme quality signals to applicants. We find evidence that higher GMAT scores of existing students increase applications, as do higher post MBA salaries. Meanwhile, university and programme professional accreditations do not impact on student application choices, nor do alumni ratings of programme quality. Published MBA programme rankings appear to have little impact on applications, and where an effect can be identified, it appears that a better ranking discourages applications.

AB - This paper explores the relationship between fees charged by MBA programmes and the number of applications to these programmes, using a panel dataset comprising universities from countries across the world. Using Three-Stage-Least-Squares methods for simultaneous equations, we find a two-way relationship between fees and applications: higher application numbers encourage universities to charge higher fees in the future, but higher fees in turn curtail application numbers. Of particular note are the results pertaining to additional explanatory variables that potentially represent MBA programme quality signals to applicants. We find evidence that higher GMAT scores of existing students increase applications, as do higher post MBA salaries. Meanwhile, university and programme professional accreditations do not impact on student application choices, nor do alumni ratings of programme quality. Published MBA programme rankings appear to have little impact on applications, and where an effect can be identified, it appears that a better ranking discourages applications.

M3 - Working paper

T3 - Economics Working Paper Series

SP - 1

EP - 38

BT - The International Market for MBA Qualifications

PB - The Department of Economics

CY - Lancaster

ER -