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  • JHGE14-91R1 MO comments & MDi.CLG

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Historical Geography. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Historical Geography, 53, 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.jhg.2016.03.003

    Accepted author manuscript, 3.94 MB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

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‘The Modern Atlas’: compressed air and cities c. 1850–1930

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>30/07/2016
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Historical Geography
Volume53
Number of pages17
Pages (from-to)11-27
<mark>State</mark>Published
Early online date23/04/16
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

This article provides an overview of pneumatic technologies in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Western cities. As urban centres continued to grow and expand in the nineteenth century, networks of compressed air were introduced to provide public utilities and private services in a variety of domains, ranging from postal services to beauty parlours. Previously used in mining and large construction works, pneumatic technologies seemed to rival electricity towards the end of the nineteenth century in the provision of urban utilities. Eventually, however, these technologies did not prove flexible enough to keep up with rapid urban population growth and the expansion of cities themselves, nor were they able to become glorious symbols of urban modernity. Through an overview of compressed air applications as used in urban centres, particularly Paris and London, the article provides an insight into the relationship between technological networks and urban modernities from the perspective of this relatively neglected urban network and technology.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Historical Geography. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Historical Geography, 53, 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.jhg.2016.03.003